Some updates on the Congressional Race

April 29th, 2012
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As you have probably noticed, this page does not have a lot of updated content. Sorry about that, but the fact of the matter is that I’ve been spending the vast majority of my time running for the US Congress.  Right now is an important time.  On May 18, delegates from town committees in my district will cast their votes in the state party convention. How many votes I get will determine if I am the candidate or if I can move onto a primary.  As it stands now, I believe there will be enough votes for a primary but not enough for a win outright, so that means there will be a primary in August.

Each town in the district has a committee and those committees pick delegates to go to the convention.  I have to get out to town committee meetings and speak to the members and delegates in order to secure their votes.

I have to admit that I don’t expect to do as well as I’d like in the convention for a number of reasons.  One is that I started as a novice and really didn’t know how to go about the process for the first month or so.  I’ve got it down now, but my opponent has a head start.  He already managed to get a number of town committees to endorse him.  In these late days my opponent has been on a blitz of events in many towns across the district.  It’s important that I do the same.

After the May 18 convention, I should have a little bit more time to post, at least until we get closer to the primary, but I certainly won’t have as much time as I have in the past.

My Site Can Be Found Here

There are several things you can do if you support my candidacy:

  1. Contribute money - I cannot stress this enough. It’s critical. I’m not asking for a handout for nothing here, because I’ve already just about broke my bank account spending money on this.  The money goes to a campaign committee and it’s not something I can use for just anything.  Campaigning is VERY expensive and contrary to popular belief, I am not rolling in big corporate donations.  If you donate $100, it will make a BIG difference right now.  If you donate $50 it will make a significant difference.  If you plan on contributing, please don’t hold off for some future date.  I really need it now.  Even if you can only contribute $10, it’s going to help.
  2. “Like” My Page on Facebook - You can do this regardless of whether you are a US citizen or not and it’s very important and very helpful, so please do so and ask your friends and family to do so.  The page  can be found at www.facebook.com/Packard2012.   The reason this is important is that the convention and delegate votes are based heavily on a popularity contest.  They want to vote for whomever they think has a greater base of support.  A high number of likes on Facebook helps show that I do have that support.
  3. Volunteer – Really, I need people in Connecticut for this, but at this time, volunteers for events and other functions are very very important.  Please contact me ASAP if you are in the area and can help out.
  4. Get the word out - Please, talk about this on Facebook, post about it in your blogs, link to my stuff on sites like Digg and Reddit.  It helps get the profile up and, again, boosts the profile.

I’ve gotten a lot of contacts from people who live outside my area and want to help, but either don’t have any money to contribute or can’t contribute because they are not US citizens and who want to help out anyway.  Unfortunately, while I really appreciate that sentiment, aside from liking the content on Facebook and helping get the word out, there’s not much in terms of volunteer activities I can offer to those who are not physically close by.  As we move toward the general election, there might be more chances for those who want to contribute content or editing services to do so, but right now, that’s just not what we have to focus on.

For campaign-related contacts, please send email to Steve@packard2012.org


This entry was posted on Sunday, April 29th, 2012 at 8:18 am and is filed under personal, Politics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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30 Responses to “Some updates on the Congressional Race”

  1. 1
    Bill P. Godfrey Says:

    I’m a UK citizen…

    I’ve given money to people as street-performer-esque tips to video makers in the past. I really like your website and never wanted to click on your “wierd old” adverts. If you had a paypal donate link, I’d happily donate for *depleted cranium*.

    What you do with the cash is up to you and none of my business.


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  2. 2
    Anon Says:

    The people who enforce the rules on political donations probably would find a problem with such a paypal link, especially if it didn’t predate the campaign.


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  3. 3
    drbuzz0 Says:

    I appreciate it, but I just can’t take money in any way shape or form from someone not authorized to contribute. It might well be against your own national law to contribute to foreign campaigns too.

    But I do need contributions a real lot. It’s not a stretch to say that a few hundred dollars right now could make the difference between winning and losing. Right now, we’re spending down the budget down to almost zero and every time we do a meet a greet or other small event, it cost a couple hundred and can make a MASSIVE difference in where we go from here.

    Also, if everyone who said “But I don’t have enough money to make a donation” donated ten bucks (which I’m pretty sure they all have) it would also make a huge difference.


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  4. 4
    Laurie Savage Says:

    I’m sorry, I enjoy and often agree with the views in your web site, but I still cannot get my head around your running as a Republican. In a normal country, say Australia or the UK you’d be a Conservative or Liberal but they’re raving socialists compared with your party! I’m still not sure how a rational person can stand on the same platform as Gingrich, Palin, Bachman or Perry. (At least Romney is sane).


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  5. 5
    Shafe Says:

            Laurie Savage said:

    I’m still not sure how a rational person can stand on the same platform as Gingrich, Palin, Bachman or Perry. (At least Romney is sane).

    Versus what: Pelosi, Reid, Boxer and Biden??

    1) For the most part, the option between the two parties is “six of one, half-dozen of the other.” They’re not as different as they try to make people believe.

    2) His key plank is abundant and sustainable energy. The Democrats are full-on for renewables, right now. Incompatible.

    3) The incumbent is a Democrat. He made a strategic decision to not try to run a primary campaign against an incumbent.


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  6. 6
    Anon Says:

    The Republicans used to be a reasonable party, maybe they could be one again if they got some sane congresscritters.


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  7. 7
    BMS Says:

    Eh … Steve is clearly a moderate. There are plenty of them in both American parties (Republican and Democrat). They usually don’t capture the headlines, however.

    Don’t confuse the moderates with the extremists.


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  8. 8
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Laurie Savage said:

    I’m sorry, I enjoy and often agree with the views in your web site, but I still cannot get my head around your running as a Republican. In a normal country, say Australia or the UK you’d be a Conservative or Liberal but they’re raving socialists compared with your party! I’m still not sure how a rational person can stand on the same platform as Gingrich, Palin, Bachman or Perry. (At least Romney is sane).

    I don’t. I stand above them, but only because I stand on the shoulders of giants. Giants with names like Eisenhower, Goldwater, Reagan, Ford and Rockefeller


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  9. 9
    George Carty Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    I stand above them, but only because I stand on the shoulders of giants. Giants with names like Eisenhower, Goldwater, Reagan, Ford and Rockefeller

    I understand that Goldwater’s views of the Religious Right were negative in the extreme…


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  10. 10
    Matte Says:

            Anon said:

    The Republicans used to be a reasonable party, maybe they could be one again if they got some sane congresscritters.

    Like the good Dr. Buzzo?!

    Sorry Buzzo, I would contribute but I am a foreign national (though it is not illegal for me to send you money), but i did like your FB page, plastic smile and all!

    Good luck, I understand why you went with the Republicans and remember;
    “In the land of the blind, the one eyed is king!”. As long as you survive all the political backstabbing that goes on…


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  11. 11
    Robert Sneddon Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    I don’t.

    I stand above them, but only because I stand on the shoulders of giants. Giants with names like Eisenhower, Goldwater, Reagan, Ford and Rockefeller

    No Nixon in there? He was after all a towering historical figure who revolutionised American politics with his winning Southern Strategy (“Well, if you Democrats can’t stand to be the party of white racists any more we’ll take them off your hands.”).

    Compared to the pinko socialist Eisenhower with his big-spending collectivist Interstate highway system paid for by 90%-plus top income tax rates and Reagan’s cutting and running from Beirut and his willingness to sign off on tax rise after tax rise Nixon stands out as the only true conservative Republican in the past sixty years or more. The way he cut bloat out of the Federal budget by shutting down the Apollo program, for example. True Republican “cloth coat” economics.


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  12. 12
    drbuzz0 Says:

            George Carty said:

    I understand that Goldwater’s views of the Religious Right were negative in the extreme…

    He believed that true conservatism was secular and an inclusive movement with the goals of preserving individual freedom. He was often called un-conservative for this. He did not take kindly to that. He died in 1998. In the 1990′s he was very vocal about how the religious right was ruining the conservative movement. He suggested that any real Republican should kick some of the televangelists in the teeth.

            Robert Sneddon said:

    No Nixon in there? He was after all a towering historical figure who revolutionised American politics with his winning Southern Strategy (“Well, if you Democrats can’t stand to be the party of white racists any more we’ll take them off your hands.”).

    But I’m not a racist, and actually take offense to it.

    Besides, while there’s no doubt, Nixon’s administration was efficient in some respects, he was also a criminal.

            Robert Sneddon said:

    Compared to the pinko socialist Eisenhower with his big-spending collectivist Interstate highway system paid for by 90%-plus top income tax rates

    I’m not opposed to government infrastructure construction. That said, there’s much I can say against Eisenhower’s policies, but he was a social moderate who was unifying, preferred peace to war, acted as a statesman and promoted nuclear energy and science tirelessly.

            Robert Sneddon said:

    and Reagan’s cutting and running from Beirut and his willingness to sign off on tax rise after tax rise Nixon stands out as the only true conservative Republican in the past sixty years or more. The way he cut bloat out of the Federal budget by shutting down the Apollo program, for example.

    I’m not against all government programs and certainly the Apollo program, for all its expense, is one I would never be against. It was strategically important if nothing else, for its focusing American science and technology and helping keep us ahead in the battle for brains. Aside from that, it put a man on the moon, which is bargain at twice the price.

    As for Reagan: Again, imperfect. But he was tolerant, he had a vision that was inclusive and positive and Americans could rally around him with pride and not be divided by petty social issues.

            Robert Sneddon said:

    True Republican “cloth coat” economics.

    A true Republican? Like a true Scottsman?


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  13. 13
    Robert Sneddon Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    As for Reagan: Again, imperfect. But he was tolerant, he had a vision that was inclusive and positive and Americans could rally around him with pride and not be divided by petty social issues.

    “Strapping young bucks eating T-bone steaks” and “Welfare queens driving Cadillacs”. Reagan inherited Nixon’s successful Southern Strategy and knew what the Republican core voters wanted to hear, and he gave it to them in spades (so to speak). He also went on and on about the US national deficit and left office with the US even deeper in debt after spending billions on boondoggles like the “Star Wars” missile defence system. We’ll skip lightly over the Iran-Contra affair which was, if Iran is a true enemy of the US, probably treason in its strictest legal sense (the traitors to the Crown who incited the American Revolution and later wrote the US Constitution were very careful to define the act of treason in US law to exclude their own earlier act of unlawful rebellion).


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  14. 14
    Vader Says:

    Okay, Robert, we get your point already: You won’t be voting for Steve.


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  15. 15
    Shafe Says:

    And what is a ‘P-HOUND’?

    Will the filters allow the word “Poon?” If not, I’ll go with P00n-Hound. Alternately, the P can be for a certain synonym for “Kitty.”

    In other words, he digs the ladies.


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  16. 16
    drbuzz0 Says:

    I deleted a previous comment because it was a ridiculous personal attack, and in this kind of thing, I just can’t have that. Furthermore, I don’t care who does not like me. You gotta get used to some people not liking you sometimes.

    Sorry if that seems like it is getting into a grey area on my spam policy, but this is my site and I have no use for that crap.


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  17. 17
    Shafe Says:

    Feel free to delete my P00n comment, too. It makes no sense without Anon’s question, and only serves to make me look like I’m randomly inserting smutty content.


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  18. 18
    Q Says:

    Steve, as I have read, your opponent is Rosa Delauro. Since I am sure science is going to be a big part of what you are all about, can you relate what you think of the incumbent’s science policy and how you would do better?


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  19. 19
    George Carty Says:

            Vader said:

    Okay, Robert, we get your point already: You won’t be voting for Steve.

    Obviously not as he’s not a US citizen!

    I think that contrary to what Robert’s saying, contempt for the poor in America is widespread, and isn’t confined only to Republicans and/or racists. I expect that it’s the flipside of the American Dream — since the American Dream claims that anyone who works hard will get rich, Americans have a tendency to believe that poor people are lazy.


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  20. 20
    Anon Says:

            George Carty said:

    Obviously not as he’s not a US citizen!

    I think that contrary to what Robert’s saying, contempt for the poor in America is widespread, and isn’t confined only to Republicans and/or racists. I expect that it’s the flipside of the American Dream — since the American Dream claims that anyone who works hard will get rich, Americans have a tendency to believe that poor people are lazy.

    Hardly confined to America, though it does seem to be more prevalent there for whatever reason.


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  21. 21
    Shafe Says:

            George Carty said:

    I expect that it’s the flipside of the American Dream — since the American Dream claims that anyone who works hard will get rich, Americans have a tendency to believe that poor people are lazy.

    Speaking for myself, and I believe, my peers in the middle class, there is a real class divide. But it’s not a divide between the wealthy and the middle class or the poor. It’s a matter of having class versus being “low class.” Thus it doesn’t matter if you’re from the hood, the barrio, the trailer park, the burbs, or uptown Manhattan. Carry yourself with some regard for decency and decorum and we will view you favorably. Show no respect for yourself or others, and we won’t.

    Paris Hilton can be upper class, but her money can’t buy her class, her behavior defines her lack of class. On the other hand, I was friends with a man who never made an income above the poverty line, scraped for everything, worked in a pawn shop. That’s where he made money to live, but his passion was being a Scout Master. He gave all his efforts to bettering kids who were mostly poor. He had respect for himself and others and showed real class.

    People see Americans being impatient or disdainful with the poor, but it’s not the “poor” to whom we take exception. It’s the low-class, the entitled. It may appear intolerant, but I cannot apologize for having a low opinion of people who share my society, but share none of the values that I believe make our society great.


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  22. 22
    crf Says:

    You’re hopefully running for the House, but I want to know your opinion about the filibuster in the Senate. Could you share your thoughts on that?


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  23. 23
    drbuzz0 Says:

            crf said:

    You’re hopefully running for the House, but I want to know your opinion about the filibuster in the Senate. Could you share your thoughts on that?

    I would be against getting rid of it. It has a place. Granted, it has been abused in the past and gained some notoriety, but the filibuster can be overridden anyway by a 60% majority. It only works when there is a slim majority and even then, it is not something that can be done for an unlimited period of time. If the legislation is important enough to the majority they can just call the bluff and wait it out.

    The majority can just refuse to take further business and that leaves the parties filibustering with no way of keeping it open other than to stand and talk indefinitely. Strom Thurmond set a record by doing this for a little more than 24 hours.


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  24. 24
    SteveK9 Says:

            BMS said:

    Eh … Steve is clearly a moderate. There are plenty of them in both American parties (Republican and Democrat). They usually don’t capture the headlines, however.

    Don’t confuse the moderates with the extremists.

    The earlier comment by Laurie was what I would have written. I too like a lot of what the author of this site has to say, particularly his support for nuclear power. But, to say (as you do above) that there are a lot of moderates in the Republican party right now seems completely false, to me.


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  25. 25
    SteveK9 Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    I would be against getting rid of it.

    It has a place. Granted, it has been abused in the past and gained some notoriety, but the filibuster can be overridden anyway by a 60% majority. It only works when there is a slim majority and even then, it is not something that can be done for an unlimited period of time.

    If the legislation is important enough to the majority they can just call the bluff and wait it out.

    The majority can just refuse to take further business and that leaves the parties filibustering with no way of keeping it open other than to stand and talk indefinitely.

    Strom Thurmond set a record by doing this for a little more than 24 hours.

    Analyze the past 3 years with the clarity you always apply to technical questions, and you may want to re-think this. Some changes are in order.


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  26. 26
    BMS Says:

            SteveK9 said:

    But, to say (as you do above) that there are a lot of moderates in the Republican party right now seems completely false, to me.

    Well, if you are an extreme Democrat, and tend to think in a highly partisan fashion, then I can see how you would have this opinion.


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  27. 27
    drbuzz0 Says:

            SteveK9 said:

    But, to say (as you do above) that there are a lot of moderates in the Republican party right now seems completely false, to me.

    Are you saying this as someone who goes to local republican town committee meetings nearly every night or someone who sees republicans on television?


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  28. 28
    Gordon Says:

    I think it’s great that you are running. I’m sure that there are a lot of interesting things you’ve learned. I was just wondering if you could give us some idea of what how it is different than you expected or what you have personally experienced of note in the process?

    My cousin ran for office. It is in Canada, so the procedures are not identical, but I’d imagine most of the principles and and the work is about the same. He was telling me it was an experience that was nothing like he had expected and really opened his mind to how things work in ways he would not have expected.

    I guess I am asking “what does it look like from your side” or “what is it like to run”


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  29. 29
    drbuzz0 Says:

    Well, Gordon, I’ve learned a few things:

    First, it’s harder than I thought. I thought it would be a lot of work, but I underestimated it. I’m talking like 16+ hours a day doing random things ranging from editing flyers to writing letters to making calls and so on.

    It’s very hard to get people to help out. Most people seem to have no appreciation as to how few people I have helping me or how hard I work. They seem to think it’s not reasonable for me to keep asking them to spend a couple hours doing some basic stuff. Although there are a few who do understand and help out, and they are real gems. The big problem is how hard it is to keep people doing it. People will help at first, but they get bored or tired out. You need help for months on end, and much of it is not the most interesting work in the world.

    There are a lot of smug armchair quarterbacks who tell you what to do or think they know how easy it is or whatever. They don’t get it. It’s annoying. They seem to not understand how all-encompassing it becomes. They are just idiots. People can and should have opinions on political matters, but when it comes to the mechanics of running and campaigning, don’t pretend to be an expert on it or know how hard it is or what a candidate you support needs. Just trust that if they ask for your help, they do need it and that it’s not as easy as it looks.

    Another thing: All politics is local. That is the most true quote of all time. You can’t even understand it until you experience it. Politics is largely a social activity. A lot of it is networking and getting to know people. You go to committee meetings and shoot the bull with the various people there afterward etc. You try to make friends. That’s what it’s all about. Half the battle is becoming well acquainted with the various committees, chairpersons, officials and such in your area. If the politicians in your area recognize you, know who you are and are comfortable giving you their personal cell phone number, you are already more than half way there.

    It’s demanding and because of that you have to learn to thrive on the stress and not be hurt by it. The paradox here is that you try to be passionate and genuinely friendly, but you can’t take things personally. People you know and like will endorse someone else or decline to help you out. You can’t be hurt by that. You can’t let the stress get to you.

    I’ve had people ask how I keep it together under the pressure and with those conflicting issues. I find it surprisingly easy. You just don’t stop to dwell on any failure. There will be bumps in the road. You don’t stop to consider them. You keep moving along and making progress and stay busy. I’m just too busy to stop and worry about anything. I’m too occupied to dwell on stress or let it get to me. At first, I got bothered by things. Now I don’t. I never let something hit me personally or emotionally. I’m just too busy making progress.

    Another thing: You can’t be a drama queen or king at all. You can’t bitch at all. It will get you nowhere. Nobody cares about what you feel. Now mind you, I am telling you how it is because you asked me directly, but as a general point, I do not go around talking a lot about how much hard work it is. There’s no point. It gets you nowhere. There is no sympathy. That’s probably a good thing, actually, because there shouldn’t be. It’s not personal or about you.

    An important thing I learned: pretty much everything you learned in civics class or political science courses is bull****. It’s all formalities, technicalities and sterilized info on theory that does not apply. I feel kinda bad for people who spent good money on a degree in PS. It’s not that all you learn is false, it’s just that it’s not really the important stuff nor does it really qualify you to understand the actual process. You don’t get it until you get your hands dirty. It’s social and cultural and the only way to really get it and learn the language is immersion.

    Now here is the biggest secret I’ve learned:

    You can do it. Anyone can do it. Anyone can run for office and win. No background or connections necessary. Those help, sure, but you can acquire them.

    It’s a lot of work. You have to be committed. However, Joe Blow who wants to make a difference can run for office. Joe Blow can work his way, without much resistance, into the world of local politics and become something. It’s obtainable. Joe Blow might not win the first time, but he can mount an effective campaign that has a chance of winning.


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  30. 30
    Wayne Winsley Says:

    Steve, you are absolutely right. The beauty of America is that Joe Blow really can become a part of the government and make a difference.


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