As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her Untreated Cancer

February 27th, 2015
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Jessicadead

 

I take no pleasure in saying this.  However, it has come to my attention that Jessica Ainscough, the woman who I predicted would die of untreated cancer has passed away.

She was 30 years.  She spent seven of those years with a slowly progressing cancer that would ultimately kill her.

It was 2012 when I predicted this outcome, noting that the slow moving cancer would likely take a few more years to kill her.  It took about three.   To be perfectly honest, that’s roughly what I had expected, based on what doctors had told me and some research on the progression of the condition.

It is surely a sad day for her friends and family.  It’s terrible to lose a life at such an age, especially when it could have been prevented.  However, I believe this needs to be publicized and used as an example of how deadly cancer quackery can be.  She spent much of her life encouraging others to go down the path of fake treatments and quackery.  The ultimate result should be proof to any others who face the difficult decision of how to treat their cancer.

More info can be found here.


This entry was posted on Friday, February 27th, 2015 at 1:03 pm and is filed under Announcements, Bad Science, Quackery. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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101 Responses to “As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her Untreated Cancer”

  1. 1
    drbuzz0 Says:

    Sorry I don’t have more to say, but I am on my way to work.

    But really, what more is there to say? It’s pretty much what had been expected all along.


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  2. 2
    drbuzz0 Says:

    To those who will say, yes, but at least she choose a more natural, less painful way of going, that’s probably not the case.

    She basically stopped most posting and admitted she was not doing well last summer. So she has been really having and symptoms for the better part of a year.

    I can’t speak to exactly what ended up killing her, but with this kind of cancer it usually happens when the cancer starts to invade the life-critical organs of the body. Most often, it’s the lungs that end up giving out. The tumors just obstruct breathing. At first it’s mild, then it gets worse and worse until you die gasping for breath. Alternatively, it’s possible that it could just choke off other organs and obstruct circulation. Either way, months of agony at the end.

    So if you have cancer, PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS WOMAN’S ADVICE


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  3. 3
    Rose Says:

    So very sad to see someone go through the torture of quackery like this. I take some comfort that in the end she went back to conventional medicine and at least had palliative care. When will the Gerson psychopaths ever be held accountable for any of this? They pray on people’s desperation and then make it seem like it’s their fault when the Gerson scam inevitably fails. I do not understand how those working at the Gerson centers are able to sleep at night.


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  4. 4
    DV82XL Says:

    Ainscough was a victim of the very pseudoscience that she pushed I hope her enablers, (although given the type of person that they are they most likely won’t) understand their role in this tragedy and accept their portion of responsibility and guilt. I don’t mean the flim-flam artists selling the Gerson nonsense, they are criminal frauds without remorse that will never care beyond the fact that this is going to give them bad press and they are going to have to find another scam. No I mean all the mealy-mouthed ‘supporters’ some of whom showed up on the other threads to wax on about how brave and wise Ainscough was to ignore real medicine and chose to follow an alternate path. The ones that lectured us and called us close minded and mean. You had a hand in her death as well and I hope you all take a long hard look at yourselves in the mirror and feel ashamed. Her blood is on your hands too


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  5. 5
    Brooke Says:

    Plenty of people also die and die horrible deaths from western methods too! And those methods can shorten their lives. I took the natural route using acupuncture and I’m totally in good health now. It seems her condition became worse after the stress and emotion of dealing with her mothers death and actually resulted in the condition getting worse. She had many good years, was a great person and lived well. People should chose the treatment that’s right for them!


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  6. 6
    Rose Says:

            Brooke said:

    Plenty of people also die and die horrible deaths from western methods too! And those methods can shorten their lives. I took the natural route using acupuncture and I’m totally in good health now. It seems her condition became worse after the stress and emotion of dealing with her mothers death and actually resulted in the condition getting worse. She had many good years, was a great person and lived well. People should chose the treatment that’s right for them!

    Absolute nonsense. jessica died because her cancer progressed exactly as this cancer does. No one claims that people do not die after getting western medicine. Unlike the POS charlatans that you worship, conventional doctors are truthful their.patients about their prognosis. Oh but according to doofuses like you they’re just being mean and negative. And Jessica uttered those exact same words as you many, many times.


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  7. 7
    Grace Says:

    Wondering now how many magazines will write an article about how that quackery killed her given they took part in advertising how much it was supposed to have saved her.


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  8. 8
    Joel Says:

    Disrespectful. Celebrating her death.

    You don’t know what killed her but I am sure it was not natural healthy living.

    She always said that before she was diagnosed with cancr she didn’t pay attention to how she ate and lived like she should have and that’s why she ended up with cancer to begin with. Maybe it wasn’t enough to save her in time, but it sure helped, because she lived a healthy happy live for seven years and thrived with the cancer, which was caused by other issues before that.

    Plus, she did have toxic chemotherapy and they say she went back to the same doctors at the end.

    She did what was right for her in the end. She encouraged others to do the same thing. She was brave up to the end and spread the truth.

    Guess what, we all have to die some day and you and I are going to die to. At least live a good life while you can.


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  9. 9
    drbuzz0 Says:

    She had a good chance of survival if she had taken the doctor’s advice. She died at 30. We all have to die. We don’t all have to die at 30.

    She lived for 7 years. That’s about par for the course for this type of cancer. She probably would have died earlier, except the first occurrence was treated with surgery and chemotherapy. That probably bought her a couple of years. But ultimately, she died in the time you would expect.

    Untreated, this cancer usually kills in a few years.

    When I first learned of her and posted about her, it was early 2012. It was about three years ago. Granted, I didn’t know anything about her individual diagnostic results, but I e-mailed some doctors who are specialists in cancer and one who treated cancer like this. I also looked at the statistics for how this kind of cancer progresses (organizations like the CDC, the WHO etc have tables of statistics)

    The prognosis was inescapable. This was not going to end well. She might well live a few years. She would be lucky to make it much past the age of 30.

    So yeah, that was 3 years ago.

    I’m not here to gloat about being right. Ultimately, I’m not an expert, but the experts who weighed in on it and the data behind it all said things were going to happen a certain way and that’s what happened. It’s not about me being right. It’s the clinical, scientific data. You can’t escape it.

    Modern medicine understands cancer.

    She did not live seven years of health and thriving either. The first couple may not have been too bad. She lost most of the use of her arm and was in bad pain well over a year ago. Last summer she basically stopped blogging, stopped lecturing and stopped doing anything public because she was in such bad condition she was in bad shape.

    The few accounts of her shoulder being a bleeding, swollen mess make it sound like it wasn’t very pleasant. it got worse, though.

    This cancer can kill you a number of different ways. None of them are pleasant. More often than not death is a result of respiroty failure, when the tumors invade the lung tissue. It can also block off the airway, or it can destroy the liver or cut off circulation. It’s slow. It starts to invade the abdominal organs.

    She ultimately imposed the worst punishment on herself. Her decisions caused her death. I don’t feel good about that.

    I had honestly hoped that she would eventually turn around. Nothing would have made me happier than for her to come out publicly and say “The alternative practitioners had been lying to me and I’m not working with competent cancer doctors who say that I still have a fighting chance.”

    If she had changed her mind three or four years ago, she might well have had the chance to beat it. Apparently she only started to turn back to medicine last year. It was just too late for anyone to do anything.

    Considering what cancer like this does to your body, I do very much hope that her last few months were spent in a facility that was able to give her a lot of morphine and other pain killers and that she had the best palliative care possible. When she finally turned back to real medicine, all that was left to offer her was some pain relief.


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  10. 10
    DV82XL Says:

            Joel said:

    Disrespectful. Celebrating her death..

    How dare you? No one here is happy she is dead.

            Joel said:

    You don’t know what killed her but I am sure it was not natural healthy living.

    We do know what killed her. Stupidity.

    Idiots like you can try and spin this and twist and prevaricate, but if this person had listened to real doctors she would be alive today. Yes she would have been missing an arm, but she would have been alive. Her mom might have lived too if she hadn’t been talked into this nonsense, and if you read between the lines, Ainscough was feeling guilty about that too.

    This is a tragedy and a farce but if it is to have any meaning, demonstrating that ‘alternate’ medicine is a crock. Any other interpretation is trivializing her death.


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  11. 11
    Don Says:

    Check out this article from a year ago, makes me a little sick:

    http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/the-way-of-the-wellness-warrior-20140128-31lis.html

    It says:
    She had been reading up and was now “more confident I was able to heal myself”.

    The doctors were unimpressed. “It was foreign to them,” Jess says of the alternative treatments she was adopting. “They didn’t want me to do something silly.”

    But amputation didn’t sound like a “very attractive option” particularly given the doctors couldn’t guarantee that, if she had it, she would be healed.

    For this reason, taking an alternative approach “was a gamble I was willing to take”, Jess says.

    It paid off.

    ——–

    How did it pay off? She died in roughly the period of time that the doctors expected her to die.

    By the way, her mother died too after doing the exact same therapy (would think that would be a wakeup call)

    her mum had breast cancer, but it had not spread. It was early stage breast cancer. There was a doctor talking about it on a morning show in Australia after her mum died. He was angry and upset about it because he said “At the stage that they discovered the cancer, she should have lived. We should have been able to save her.” He went on to say that if she had followed medical advice that they would have had to remove some of her breast and that it was possible she would have had to lose the entire breast. He said that they sometimes try to remove just the tumor portion, but that it’s often lead to the whole breast being removed.

    Her mother did die too.


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  12. 12
    drbuzz0 Says:

    I don’t know exactly what stage of cancer her mother had. Apparently they didn’t release that information

    But there is some analysis here:

    http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2013/10/17/sharyn-ainscough-dies-tragically-because-she-followed-the-example-of-her-daughter-the-wellness-warrior/

    Some doctors have weighed in on it too.

    The long and short of it is that if the cancer had not spread beyond the breast tissue she would have lived. The ten year survival rate for that is extremely high. It’s on the order of 98%

    But it moves fast, so it needs to be treated right away. The key is whether it has spread beyond the breast or not. If it is confined to the breast, it should be curable. If it has invaded other structures, it becomes very deadly.

    If early breast cancer is detected and no treatment is provided, the average life expectancy is 2.7 years.

    It was about two and a half years between the time her mother was diagnosed with the cancer and when she died.

    So the therapy did nothing. She died in approximately the time you would expect.


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  13. 13
    Q Says:

            Brooke said:

    Plenty of people also die and die horrible deaths from western methods too! And those methods can shorten their lives. I took the natural route using acupuncture and I’m totally in good health now. It seems her condition became worse after the stress and emotion of dealing with her mothers death and actually resulted in the condition getting worse. She had many good years, was a great person and lived well. People should chose the treatment that’s right for them!

    My mother died a few years ago. It was a bad time. It affected me a lot. I didn’t die. Most people will live to lose their parents. It’s a terrible thing, but that alone should not kill you.

    She died a couple years after her mother anyway.

    What is telling is that she died exactly as science and modern medicine expected. It was practically a textbook example.

    Read back on what the author wrote three years ago. He looked at the medical data and he asked some doctors what they thought. The conclusion: She is going to die from this, but it probably won’t happen for a few years.

    Um. Guess what happened? Yeah. Exactly what medicine said would happen. No joy in it. We’re not feeling vindicated, because we knew it all along.


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  14. 14
    Rose Says:

    No one takes any pleasure is the death of a young woman barely into her 30′s. No one. However, the message that needs to be spread about this is too important to remain silent. Quackery does not work and people who choose quackery will always die from their cancers and generally within a predictable amount of time. The only “alternative” Gerson offers a person is to die of untreated cancer, but actually what they do is one step worse than untreated cancer. Jessica spent TWO YEARS of her short life housebound, giving herself unnecessary coffee enemas, drinking expensive juice, and at one point giving the Gerson shysters her hard-earned money. She did not get to go in the ocean (something she loved) or eat fruit (another thing she loved). Her quest for positivity and self-love in every single endeavour looked down-right exhausting to me. She was obsessed with everything she ate to the point of being orthorexic. She had a public meltdown after eating a burger that was not organic. She was miserable doing this nonsense; I don’t care how well she faked it on her website.

    And it was all for naught.

    This is what we are against. We are against this pure TORTURE of people for absolutely no reason whatsoever. It is cruel. This poor woman at least could have spent the past seven years eating a cheeseburger and drinking wine. She could have also avoided the potentially dangerous and uncomfortable FIVE TIMES DAILY enemas she gave herself.

    But the worst thing that happened to Jessica in her lifetime is that she was convinced that the cancer was within her control, and that if it spread, she was doing something wrong. She did not just get to suffer from untreated cancer, but she got to suffer through the additional guilt of feeling that she had failed.

    But yes, all her followers can go ahead and post messages here about what a mean, judgmental bully I am. Go right ahead. Tell me what a horrible person I am for not “respecting” Jessica’s “choice”. Tell me how horrible I am for not understanding that this is just “another option” that is actually better than conventional medicine. I am guessing you are not yet comfortable telling me that the reason Jessica died is because she screwed something up. Because isn’t that always the way with these things? The patient who dies is always the failure, and never the “treatment”. I am sure though that given some time, this line of “logic” will infect Jessica’s legacy.


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  15. 15
    drbuzz0 Says:

    Apparently her facebook page is now removed. I think it might have been removed earlier when she started getting too many uncomfortable comments about her condition. Her website is also down, it now redirects to a brief memorial and asking to donate money to a cause.

    I get the feeling it’s all damage control. Basically removing stuff that could attract scrutiny or negative comments. It would be bad publicity. Ultimately it’s a money thing.

    Now one may say “But she’s dead. Why would the page be taken down for bad publicity? She can’t make any money now”

    The thing is, even if she is gone, she was likely just the public face of this. This is a whole enterprise. What she was selling was not a one woman operation. She had handlers, publicists, affiliates etc. They were making money.

    Hence, there’s still reason to protect the reputation. Jessica Ainscough may be dead, but “Jessica Ainscough Incorporated” likely lives on. There are those with stakes in it.


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  16. 16
    Rob AUS Says:

    My GF was a big follower of hers and went to her lectures twice. She seemed very positive and in command. I’m pretty shocked this happened. I do not like the tone of this or the comments either.

    What I do not get is the author here says he knew she was going to die. Knew she would die? What kind of person are you to know someone is going to die and not do something to stop it. Death is not reversible. Once someone dies, it’s too late. When they are alive, it’s not too late and there is hope. Three years ago he said she would die. He turned out to be right. Fine, pat yourself on the back for that one, but why didn’t you try to save her.

    it just seems so amazing to me you could not feel some guilt even. To stand here and say she would die and not do anything.


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  17. 17
    drbuzz0 Says:

    Rob, I did try. I knew she would not listen to me, just some random guy on the internet, when she had surely heard from others, but I figured I should try just the same.

    I wrote her several e-mails and left comments. I told her I wanted to talk to her further or refer her to someone. I didn’t berate her or act judgmental. I just said she seemed like a nice person an I didn’t want her to die. I told her I was not a doctor but that I had quite a bit of experience in the field of science advocacy and quackery. I said I knew a thing or two about how these alternative medicine schemes work.

    I actually tried a couple of different tactics. I tried telling saying that she needed to consider the honesty of the pushers of the alternative medicine treatments. I tried telling her I was worried and wanted her to explain to me how she could be so sure it worked.

    I did get one response akin to “Thank you, but I know what I am doing and have very smart people guiding me and have done my research and my body tells me this is right… yada yada”

    But yeah, I made a real effort to try to persuade her to do something.

    I didn’t think it would work. I know others had before. I knew that as a random guy from the internet, I had very little chance. But I felt a moral duty to try.

    There was nothing else I could do. Nothing else anyone could do.


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  18. 18
    Sarah K Says:

    RIP Jessica

    People die after surgery and radiation and chemo too. Chemo kills more than cancer. She had chemo before and there’s a good chance that’s what killed her in the end.

    Everyone has to make their right choice for their own life. She lived on her own terms. I think she made the right choice.

    Maybe she died in the end, but we all die in the end. She chose to have a happy healthy life and that’s what she had.

    her mistake was waiting until she had cancer and had tried chemo bfore living healthy. The lesson for us all is to live healthy from the start and don’t wait for your body to tell you it needs some tlc.

    She still made the right choice for her.


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  19. 19
    Sarah K Says:

    I hope you all get cancer and have to make that tough choice for yourselfs

    If you keep rejecting healthy living, you probably will ge tcancer. Maybe then we can dance on your graves too


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  20. 20
    RIP Wellness Warrior Says:

    she lived on her own terms healthy and happy. she taught others to do the same.

    I believe she died because her work was over and god called her back home to be an angel. it wasnt from cancer. she was healthy and thriving. She left the world a better place

    shame on those who already want to dirty her reputation.

    she enlightened many people who will live better and that was her gift. the best cure for cancer is never to get it. her message was hope and health. she will live on in all of us who learned from her


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  21. 21
    Brenda McCoy Says:

    this post is offensive. so is the one linked that predicted her death.

    are you proud of yourself because you said she would die and she did?

    I thought she would make it with her positve living and healthy life. i guess it was not enough. she lived a good few years but it wasn’t enough to save her.

    I was wrong and you were right and Jess was wrong. I bet that makes you feel really good. you feel like you won something? like ir better then us or u need a troopy because you said she was going to die and she did.


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  22. 22
    Russ Says:

    It is sad to see something like this coming and realize you just cant change her mind.

    steve looked at the survival rate and the statistics. cancer doctors looked at them. other science bloggers looked at them and all agreed “yep. without treatment shell be dead in the next few yers

    plain as it was, she stayed oblivious to it. too bad. such a wasted life


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  23. 23
    Coco Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    Apparently her facebook page is now removed. I think it might have been removed earlier when she started getting too many uncomfortable comments about her condition.

    Her website is also down, it now redirects to a brief memorial and asking to donate money to a cause.

    I get the feeling it’s all damage control. Basically removing stuff that could attract scrutiny or negative comments. It would be bad publicity. Ultimately it’s a money thing.

    Now one may say “But she’s dead. Why would the page be taken down for bad publicity? She can’t make any money now”

    The thing is, even if she is gone, she was likely just the public face of this. This is a whole enterprise. What she was selling was not a one woman operation. She had handlers, publicists, affiliates etc. They were making money.

    Hence, there’s still reason to protect the reputation. Jessica Ainscough may be dead, but “Jessica Ainscough Incorporated” likely lives on. There are those with stakes in it.

    —I was thinking about this and wondering why her people wouldnt leave the sites up for her tribe to communicate condolences or even maintain the information for continued reference (if it was genuinely good advice). The only conclusion I could come to was that it was damage control and they needed to hide it all because it’s now a liability. The fact that she advocated and “EDUCATED” tens of thousands of people means there must be some responsibility taken for the influence she had. As a former follower myself, I believed her message and even though she may never have explicitly said so, I had the impression/belief that she had been through remission and was cured all due to her new holistic lifestyle. THAT is the dangerous part. People looked up to her and didnt realise there was a dark hidden reality. I have no doubt that people made decisions based on her preachings, I only hope they havent suffered and died. I am sad she is gone and sad that she lost her mother and sad that her father lost them both.


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  24. 24
    Coco Says:

            Sarah K said:

    I hope you all get cancer and have to make that tough choice for yourselfs

    If you keep rejecting healthy living, you probably will ge tcancer.

    Maybe then we can dance on your graves too

    Sarah, this is a horrible thing to say. You should be ashamed of yourself. There is no need for the hostile attitude and I doubt Jess would condone it.


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  25. 25
    Liam G Says:

    My mother died of cancer recently. Difference between my mum and Jess is that Jess could still be alive if she got proper treatment. Also, Jess’s mum could still be alive today if she got treatment. Now there are three dead people instead of one.

    Knowing my Mum – she would be in heaven right now telling them they are both epic idiots.

    Epic fail JESS AINCOUGH!


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  26. 26
    BMS Says:

            Coco said:

    Sarah, this is a horrible thing to say.

    People like Sarah often become bitter and hostile when their world view gets challenged by reality.


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  27. 27
    Matte Says:

    Even though every death is tragic and any death that is PREVENTABLE is even more tragic, I have to say that I am pleased to realise that we have not completely eradicated natural selection from society.

    Now, I have never met Jess A. or heard her speak so I don’t know if she was a victim of her own stupidity or if she had fallen victim to a bad crowd of merciless peddlers of pseudoscience. Dr. Buzzo and his valiant attempt at reason and approaching this woman, even though he was convinced he would not succeed actually is, is if not border line heroic, pretty darn close!


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  28. 28
    Rose Says:

    Rob,

    I went to Jessica’s facebook page on several occasions and begged her to get proper medical care. My posts were ALWAYS deleted within a couple hours. I was very gentle and respectful in my tone. We all tried to get Jessica to get real treatment but she refused to listen. In the couple of hours before my posts were deleted, people like your girlfriend would jump all over me and tell me not to be so “judgmental”. BTW, I was not the only person this happened to. Really Rob, what else were we supposed to do? And if you look at the original article here about Jessica, you will see that the author lays out very clearly how Jessica’s cancer spreads. She could have come here and read this at ANY TIME.


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  29. 29
    Rose Says:

    RIP Wellness Warrior, Brenda, Sarah, and all your ilk,

    Jessica did not do things “her way”; she did things the way that the shysters told her to do them in order to live. It turns out that being positive does not stop cancer from growing. That is the reality of the world and I am sorry that we all have to face it but it is true. Everyone here who predicted Jessica’s death is sad that this is the truth. Trust me when I tell all of you that all of us here would be thrilled beyond measure if we could cure cancers just by being elated all the time. However, we are adult, sentient humans who deal in realities.

    She was not “thriving”; that was just some b.s. to market her stuff. She has been dying of cancer for seven years. As is typical of this cancer, the first few years were okay, but she has obviously been steadily going down hill for a couple of years now. If you call being anemic and bed-ridden “thriving”, then I’d hate to see what you consider sick.

    Jessica did not turn to this stuff because she made the decision that she would die of cancer of her own terms. She chose this route because she honestly and truly believed that it would cure her of cancer. She went in full force because she was terrified of dying of cancer, and I do not blame her one bit. SHE WANTED TO LIVE. I cannot emphasize that enough. If conventional medicine told her that they had a cut/poison/burn method that would leave her arm intact and be successful 95% of the time, then she would have jumped for that option. She would have left all the natural junk behind and been totally on board with the “unnatural” way.

    Jessica convinced herself that her method would work. We all knew here that it would not work and we were devastated. This is why myself and the author here attempted on MANY occasions to reach out to Jessica. We were horrified to see someone put themselves through this for no reason, and we were especially horrified to know that she influenced other people with cancer to go through the same futile torture.

    It is too bad that the blog was deleted, and it is really too bad that Jessica spent the past couple of years deleted old posts there that no longer fit with her new persona of a person with cancer who was “thriving”. It is too bad because often people with cancer would post under their own names. I know that people like you three absolutely love anecdotes and testimonials, so here it goes: of all the people with cancer who posted under their own names, as of a few months ago, I could only find one who was still alive.

    This nonsense kills. Conventional medicine is not a guarantee, and many people still die from cancer, but it gives you your best chance. Many cancer sufferers these days get treatment that eliminates the cancer, and many other still get another 8 years instead of another 1. But most importantly, conventional medicine does not put you through the torture of making you think that the reason you have cancer is because you were not a good enough person.


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  30. 30
    Ceejay Says:

    ROSE ROSE ROSE!!!!!!!!!! All I have to say is THANK YOU!!! You are the real hero and I mean that in every sense of the word. I followed Jessica for a long long time and I followed all of her advice hoping for prevention. I will say that any healthy living is good for the body, but it is not the end all be all!!! I mean I was doing all the Gerson things short of the coffee enemas hoping for prevention. I loved going to her site and checking out her Foodie Friday. I was truly a wellness warrior right along with her, but one thing disturbed me…..I never saw pictures of that arm and saw that she was always hiding it in her pictures and videos. It wasn’t until I read on your site and saw the slow progression of the pics of her arm getting worse and worse over the years and her lying to her followers saying it was lymphedema and stress of traveling and losing her mother. I know plenty of people that have lost their parents and don’t have cancer. All I know is Rose opened my eyes to the light. I had been saving up to go to the Gerson clinic for years…following in the steps of Jessica “just in case” me or my loved ones got diagnosed with something terminal. I think it was more paranoia. I was prepared and saw alternative treatment as the ONLY option that made sense. But now after this death….which is truly sad, I am convinced that you should consult a medical professional as well as take care of yourself the best way you can. She was not being forthcoming about her condition and completely omitted a lot. It isn’t fair to mislead people ‘fully knowing’ that something was going on with her. When I found out she died on Instagram, I immediately asked the question “how did she die, because surely it wasn’t cancer, because she was cured”.. I am sure many people felt the same way. We believed in the cures of Gerson based on Jessica’s information and testimonies. Its not fair to mislead people. I am not trying to blame her now that she is gone, but I think the leaders ROSE and Depleted Cranium should be heard. People should not dismiss them. They have not been rude and disrespectful…they just want accountability and so do I!!!!!! I want those to understand that it did not cure her and ultimately she died from the cancer. We should speak up and truly inform the masses. I am on board and I am sorry people are so brainwashed not to see this as an eye-opening experience. They should never just limit themselves to natural alternative undocumented treatment, but truly consult a medical professional and get tons of second opinions before making an education decision. THANK YOU ROSE!!!!! If anyone has anything to say against what she has to say, well you will hear it from me. Don’t be fooled. I once was, but not anymore.


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  31. 31
    drbuzz0 Says:

    Just one thing about cancer and nutrition, and I’m basing this on the current research and, yes, you can ask doctors about this.

    Once you have cancer, nutrition is unlikely to make much difference in how it progresses and it won’t cure it. Of course, like any disease, you need to continue to have your basic nutritional needs covered or you won’t be able to have your body function very well. But if you have cancer and you take huge doses of vitamins, eat lots of fruit, drink lots of juice, follow some nutritional guide…. It won’t do squat.

    There is evidence that the chances of cancer can be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle. The effect is not huge, but it’s basically just a matter of keeping your overall body healthy. There’s no secret. People who maintain a healthy weight, eat a balanced diet etc have lower cancer risks. But the effect is not dramatic. It only results in a slightly lower risk.

    There has long been speculation that antioxidants would reduce the risk of cancer, but clinical studies have failed to show that this actually makes a noticeable difference.

    The best thing you can do to reduce your risk of cancer is to avoid the things we know cause it. Smoking tobacco is huge. It’s the single largest contributor to cancer that can be avoided. Tanning is not good either. Excessive drinking may contribute to liver and esophageal cancer.

    But bear in mind, these “healthy lifestyle” things are more about avoiding cancer than treating it.

    Jessica Ainscough and others often talked about how cancer is a symptom of a greater problem or a sign that you didn’t take care of your body and health or something like that.

    That is simply not true. Anyone can get cancer. Lifestyle changes only nominally reduce the likelihood. You can do everything right and still get cancer. There was a study recently which determined that most cases of cancer were “bad luck.” Well, we really already knew that.

    The basic cause of cancer is often genetic mutations that interfere with cell division. Every time a cell divides, there is potential for one of these mutations to happen. There are enzymes that repair damaged DNA, but they don’t do it 100% of the time. There is sometimes a preexisting hereditary predisposition that plays a roll in it as well.

    It can happen to anyone. It happens more often in older individuals, but it happens in young people too.

    Jessica didn’t do anything wrong to get cancer. It wasn’t that she wasn’t living a healthy lifestyle. Some of her cells just ended up with damage. It was either a copy error or a cosmic ray or an oxygen free-radical or something else. We’ll never know. But it really wasn’t her fault.


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  32. 32
    Rob AUS Says:

    If what you say is true, then what is the point of this site, what is he point of going after Jessica and what is the point of promoting anything?

    If what you say is true, then cancer is just the luck of the draw and there is nothing we can do to stop it. There is no way we can hope to stay healthy other than keeping our fingers crossed. In that cases, you would have to admit that what she did caused no harm since, as you seem to think, nothing anybody does will do anything.

    **** the healthy diet and clean lifestyle she promoted. Go eat every day at McDonalds. Go eat every chemical and GMO you want. Load up on the pharmaceuticals. Nothing matters. It’s the roll of the dice.


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  33. 33
    DV82XL Says:

            Rob AUS said:

    If what you say is true, then cancer is just the luck of the draw and there is nothing we can do to stop it. There is no way we can hope to stay healthy other than keeping our fingers crossed.

    Can you read for comprehension? Lifestyle changes cannot cure cancer, but one can reduce the chance you might get it it. That’s not nothing.


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  34. 34
    drbuzz0 Says:

    That’s not what I said at all.

    You can, as I said, reduce your chances of cancer by not smoking, not getting excessive sunlight, not drinking excessively and so on. There are other environmental causes like benzene and asbestos, but those are not things most people need to worry about being exposed to these days anyway.

    You should be encouraged to exercise regularly and try to maintain a healthy diet. It won’t do a whole lot for cancer. (It might help a little, but not a huge amount) It will help plenty of other things. You’ll have less chance of things like type II diabetes, heart disease, stroke and you’ll look and feel better.

    As for beating cancer, once you have it, that’s totally doable too. Of course, it’s not 100%. Not everyone who gets cancer will survive it. Many will. The numbers are improving too. We’ve gotten pretty good at treating cancer over the past 30-50 years.

    Two things you can do:

    1. Catch it early, because cancer is almost always treatable in its earliest stages. So get your mammograms, colonoscopies, prostate exams etc and be observant for things like unusual moles or growths and report them right away.
    2. Follow the treatment regime from a competent doctor. Don’t delay it either. If your doctor says you need surgery, radiation and chemo to have the best chance at beating the cancer, do it. I know, it sucks, but they know what they are talking about.


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  35. 35
    Rose Says:

    Ceejay, let me just say that I am so happy that you are not wasting your money and your SOUL on this nonsense! I wish I could do more than just post on the internet. But to know that you at least are not going down this path has made my day.

    You know, I understand why Jessica and others are so taken with these lies. Conventional oncologists have an ethical obligation to be truthful. That means that they will honestly tell you what, in their professional opinion, your prognosis is. So likely Jessica’s oncologist told her that she had X percent chance of dying within five years and X percent chance of dying within ten years, and that she would have a much better chance of survival with an amputation, but that they could in no way guarantee a cure or that the cancer would never come back. They were ethical and professional and they presented her with this reality. It was a harsh, unfair, and devastating reality, but it was the reality.

    The Gerson people, on the other hand, told Jessica that the oncologists were lying to her, and that they had a financial incentive to deprive her of the cure for cancer, and cure that only they had. This cure naturally has been “suppressed” by evil oncologists who are in the pockets of big pharm. They appeal to a person’s ego and fears. They make you feel like you are the “smart” one for rejecting conventional medicine. They lie and describe the process of cancer spreading in a way that makes “sense” to a person without a background in the disease. Once someone like Jessica has a false understanding of how cancer operates, they are easy dupes for the so-called cure that Gerson peddles. And, of course, this cure involves a very strict routine that is nearly impossible to adhere to with perfect consistency. Missed an enema? That is why your cancer returned then. It’s YOUR fault. The quackery obsession with the cure for cancer being wholly within the hands of the patient brings me to thing that to me is the most devastating aspect of Jessica’s philosophy: that positive thinking is powerful and cures cancer.

    This to me is what really just rips apart a person’s soul. The flingers of woo will have people believe that their attitude is a magical elixir that cures cancer. I know Jessica was very taken with this aspect of her “treatment”. She was obsessed with self-love and positive thinking. Don’t get me wrong, I think that everyone should aim for living an OVERALL joyful life, but to honestly believe that your cancer spreads or retreats based upon how positive you are is tragic. The flingers of woo absolutely love this though because it works 100% of the time to get them off the hook when their “treatments” fail (which they always do). Every single person, whether sick with cancer or fit as a fiddle, has negative thoughts. Everyone has stresses, worries, “I suck” days, sadness, guilt, etc. To claim that cancer can be cured by expecting the impossible out of a person, but at the same time making them believe it is possible, it just too cruel for me to even contemplate. I read many of the comments left on Jessica’s page, and many of the women suffering from cancer were upset that they could not live up to Jessica’s example of positivity. Unbeknownst to them, Jessica’s “positive” looking life was just the result of make-up, good lighting, and lots and lots of posts full of sayings and platitudes about joy. When Jessica finally came clean, it was clear to me that she was experiencing ALL the negative emotions that any person suffering from a terminal illness would be going through. I felt so sorry for her at that moment because I realized that all these normal emotions were made even worse by the fact that she felt like she had totally failed as an emotionally-positive person.

    I get that people want to feel that their terminal illness is in their control. I completely and totally understand why that is appealing, and I do not for one moment think that someone facing their own mortality is stupid for embracing this. It is human nature to want to feel in control. We also all really, really want to live. Jessica was desperate to live and so I understand why she went for this stuff.

    But I do hope that any supporters of Jessica and her lifestyle can understand why Depleted Cranium, myself, and many others thought that it was just too important to not be critical of it: it was a matter of life and death. I felt that it was my ethical and moral obligation to point out that Jessica’s “treatments” were all useless for curing cancer and that anyone who imitated her was doomed to die of cancer. They would die of cancer in far more pain that they needed to be in, after wasting money and time of useless treatments, but worst of all after losing the essence of their souls. They must suffer through the indignity and emotional abuse of being told that they are incapable of achieving the level of positive thinking they need in order TO LIVE. I am tears right now just typing this, because it is that disturbing to me.

    I just hope that wherever Jessica is right now that she is finally and truly at peace.


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  36. 36
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Ceejay said:

    I had been saving up to go to the Gerson clinic for years…following in the steps of Jessica “just in case” me or my loved ones got diagnosed with something terminal. I think it was more paranoia. I was prepared and saw alternative treatment as the ONLY option that made sense. But now after this death….which is truly sad, I am convinced that you should consult a medical professional as well as take care of yourself the best way you can.

    Ceejay, I totally understand your fear of cancer. It’s a really scary disease.

    The way I look at it is that we have to try to balance the fear of a disease like cancer with the realities of life.

    The fact of the matter is something is going to kill you, at some point. It could be cancer. It could be heart disease. It could be stroke, or multiple organ failure. It could even be an accident. Life is finite and our bodies are imperfect and something will go wrong.

    We all need to strike a balance on that. On one hand, we should be concerned enough to take reasonable steps to stay healthy. On the other hand, we should not spend our lives in such fear of our own mortality that it stops us from living life to the fullest.

    No, you’ll never be 100% sure cancer won’t kill you.

    If you want to do something to try to avoid that, you should talk to your doctor about screenings. Some of them are unpleasant, I know this. But cancer is usually curable in the earliest stages. I know people whose lives were saved because they had a colonoscopy.

    General health checkups, colonoscopies, pap smears, prostate exams, mammograms, skin cancer screenings and even regular dental appointments all result in lives saved from cancer.


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  37. 37
    Gordon Says:

            Sarah K said:

    I hope you all get cancer and have to make that tough choice for yourselfs

    If you keep rejecting healthy living, you probably will ge tcancer.

    Maybe then we can dance on your graves too

    Strange attitude, because if you read the article and comments everyone is saying they really wish she had lived and not gone with the treatments that don’t work.

            Liam G said:

    My mother died of cancer recently. Difference between my mum and Jess is that Jess could still be alive if she got proper treatment. Also, Jess’s mum could still be alive today if she got treatment. Now there are three dead people instead of one.

    Knowing my Mum – she would be in heaven right now telling them they are both epic idiots.

    Epic fail JESS AINCOUGH!

    Sorry about your mother. Cancer touches many lives.

    I keep hearing these alternative medicine types complain that real medicine offers no hope for many with cancer because it does not cure 100% of cancer cases. I do not understand that mentality, when clearly alternative does not have a great success ratio, and probably has a zero one.

    I hope that medicine was at least able to offer something to your mother in so far as giving her more time or reducing the suffering.

    My father died of complications from prostate cancer. He actually had it for a long time, which is common in older men because it can move very slowly. He was in his late 80′s when he died, but even with the cancer, he managed to spend the final part of his life in peace and comfort. His final couple of months were spent with at home hospice and they did a very god job of keeping his quality of life up.

    People forget even incurable cancer patients can still receive a more merciful end of life with modern medicine.


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  38. 38
    Ceejay Says:

    Rose

    Thank you for that. I appreciate your response about it. It truly is tragic. I was crying as I was reading your response. Its like nobody wins in this. I am a single mother with an 11 year old son. I couldn’t imagine the guilt she was feeling inside just knowing that what she believed or what she was tricked into believing was not truth. I would be devastated. I respect the fact you reached out to her…even though she deleted your posts. I respect that you asked her to be honest that her arm was showing signs of progression. It was direct and honest and sensitive all at the same time. You asked her to speak out about what was really happening to her instead of misleading or shall I say omitting things that were happening. There are so many women and men who have already made up their mind about their treatment even before we know we may or may not be faced with a terminal illness. We felt confident in the route she chose….but now I hope that people can see the truth and make that decision for themselves and understand that the Gerson method does not cure cancer…and the guilt that goes along with rejecting it should be unlawful. Please continue to pioneer on the truth, so that at least people know the truth and can make the choices without being misinformed. I feel like a weight has been lifted. Again THANK YOU…you truly changed my life. :-)

    drbuzz0

    Thank you for that response. Sadly up until the day she died, I actually believed, “look if I ever get cancer or a terminal illness, I am going straight to Mexico to get it cured and all these people dying of cancer is completely unnecessary….there is a cure people, just look at Jessica and ChrisbeatCancer and Kris Carr and Lorraine Day and all these people who have cured themselves…..I will just go to the clinic and will get cured and then I can be just fine. All those people dying of cancer is just wrong…those medical doctors are trying to kill us”…….. THAT WAS MY EXACT THINKING. SAD sad and sad. Her dying and running across Rose’s site and this one, woke me up within 24 hours. I totally don’t think that way. It really spun my whole head around. You are completely right about the fact that one day we will die and it is no guarantee how. But sadly I believed firmly that the only cure was Gerson and places like that. Up until the day she died, I would have completely and automatically rejected modern medicine, because I had BELEIVED that it worked on her and that I TOO could get those results. I believe it was totally in our control. So I am really trying to put my thoughts together. Thanks to this community, I see the truth. I would never reject modern medicine. Thank you so much. I cannot begin to tell you how grateful I am to the likes of you, Rose, depleted cranium. Its crazy. I am sorry about the loss of your father. I am glad that he had a peaceful ending with help and comfort.

    Thanks,
    Ceejay


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  39. 39
    Rose Says:

    Ceejay, come join us in spreading the word about the devastating effects of quackery. Oh, btw, I just wanted to let you know that Rosalie Hilleman and I are not the same person. Her blog is excellent though and I was very happy that there was another person out there trying to counter some the devastating effects of Jessica and other Gerson therapy promoters.

    My biggest hope right now is that after he has gone through the grieving process, that Jessica’s fiance will publicly speak out against Gerson and its false promises.

    One last thing: I was born and raised on a hippie commune and so I definitely was exposed to every single kind of “alternative” and “natural” cure out there, and at one point I bought a lot of it. I do understand what it is like to believe in this stuff. I get the appeal of feeling like you are in control of something totally out of your control. But in the end we are all mortal and we will all die. I guess the thing that brings me the most sadness is knowing that Jessica and her mom wasted five years between them staying home, making juice, and giving themselves enemas. I wish that they would have spent that time together walking on the beach, going to the movies, and getting a cheeseburger or maybe quaffing some wine and having a mother/daughter gossip session. To me, that is how a person gets to a state of feeling positive and loved; it is not through scheduled meditation sessions or organic kale juice.

    Ceejay, I hope that tomorrow instead of making juice and stressing over organic food and wellness that you instead take your child to the park or for a drive to some place you’ve never been before or maybe to the zoo and that you both just eat and drink whatever you damn well please. And now you can save the money you were planning to give to the Gerson shysters and do something really fun with it.


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  40. 40
    Ceejay Says:

    Rose,

    I am sorry, I thought you two were the same person. Yikes. But I agree in what you stand for and yes count me in! I want everyone to know the devastating effects of quackery, so people won’t fall for that stuff and make misinformed decisions. It will be very interesting to see what Tallon has to say about his fiance’s passing, if he says anything at all. Hopefully he will speak out about Gerson therapy. sd

    I am taking my son to the park tomorrow….its decided. Truly that is what is important.

    Thanks,
    Ceejay


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  41. 41
    Bob Says:

    Someone once made a good point about the whole alternative medicine practitioners and I don’t remember if it was here or not.

    The difference between them and an actual doctor is doctors have to give you bad ****ty news about something like cancer. If you go to a real doctor, they might say something to you like “We can probably treat this, but it will mean you lose an arm” or they might say “The odds here are not good. There’s about a 50/50 shot at beating this.” They might even say something like “I’m sorry but this is terminal. We don’t have any real chance of curing it.”

    All of those things are horrible things to hear, but they have to say them, because they have to tell you the truth and the truth sometimes sucks. If it can’t be cured, they have to say that.

    If you’re a quack, you are not bound by the real, honest way things are, so you can tell someone anything. You can paint as rosy a picture as you want. They can say “Oh sure, we can cure this. It won’t hurt either. No disfiguration. No medicines with side effects.”

    It makes you think, anyone who paints a picture that rosy you need to question their own honesty.


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  42. 42
    Rose Says:

    Bob,

    Yeah that is the thing that so many people who support and follow Jessica cannot seem to wrap their heads around. The reason that Jessica’s doctors told her that her cancer was terminal if left untreated was because they were telling her the truth, and they were 100% correct. The reason that the Gerson people told her that her cancer was treatable and could be cured by using their regime is because they were lying, and they were 100% false in their assertions.

    I really wish that people would understand what happened in Jessica’s case. Jessica had a cancer that is terminal within ten years if left untreated (some people live a little past ten years). Jessica Ainscough was going to die within ten years of her diagnosis if she did not treat her illness, and that is exactly what happened. Now her particular cancer is slow-growing and very difficult to treat. Amputation is the only way that a person with this cancer has a chance of a full life, so that is what her oncologist recommended. He did not want to do this it all, and indeed he tried desperately to save her arm (isolated limb perfusion). This did not work and so the only therapeutic option remaining was amputation. Amputation in this case does not guarantee survival, and in many cases the cancer does return. Here is the thing though: amputation is the only option where the patient has at least a CHANCE of normal lifespan. After the chemo failed, this was Jessica’s one and only chance to not die of cancer within the next ten years. Would it have been horrible? Yes. Would it have guaranteed that she never have the cancer return? No. But she would have had a reasonable chance of living a normal lifespan had she had the amputation (given her age and sex). Despite what she so desperately wanted to believe, there was not another option. That was her only option and she rejected it. Conventional medicine offered her no hard promise of a cure or of the cancer never returning. It never claimed it would. Quackery promised her the world. The woo flingers promised her that she would get to keep her arm and rid herself of her cancer without surgery, chemo or radiation. But it was all a lie and so it was not “another option” as so many claim. It was all just a big lie.

    Jessica Ainscough had TWO options only: she could get the amputation and have a chance at a normal lifespan or she could not get the amputation and be dead within ten years. That was it. Those were her two choices and she picked the second option. Anyone who claims that something different happened in this case is fooling himself. This is the raw truth and it is why so many of us are opposed to the choice Jessica made and find it to be a total travesty. The reason so many of us are angry about what happened to Jessica is that she was fed a load of lies by people who have no medical training and are not oncologists. She sadly whole-heartedly embraced these lies and she paid for it with her life. And to add insult to injury, her mother paid for it with her life too.


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  43. 43
    Kim Says:

    I do not understand why this is controversial or anything. The author said this would kill her because that’s what doctors told him and that seems to be the scientific consensus. She died. Not a surprise at all. Sad, I guess. just telling it like it is, that is what happens.

    I would have liked to see more people just say “turns out she was wrong.”

    aactually what I really want to see is a statement from some of those who made money supposedly curing her. She made all kinds of videos for a clinic in mexico. Where is their comment on this?


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  44. 44
    A Says:

    Is RobAus #16 for real? Telling you, you should have saved her?? How about pointing the finger at her family or friends – Rob? What about the a-holes that led her down the Gerson path in the first place? Get a clue Rob


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  45. 45
    A Says:

    I was another one of her “followers” who became concerned about her worsening arm, and asked questions.. she deleted, she ignored!! she was so far down the garden path, so invested in this charade and a making a fortune out of it at the same time. I’m still not sure if she was too deluded to tell the truth or if it was all about the money. Probably both.


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  46. 46
    Rose Says:

            A said:

    I was another one of her “followers” who became concerned about her worsening arm, and asked questions.. she deleted, she ignored!! she was so far down the garden path, so invested in this charade and a making a fortune out of it at the same time. I’m still not sure if she was too deluded to tell the truth or if it was all about the money. Probably both.

    I used to pose as a follower on her facebook page and very gently, over the course of many comments on my post, ease into getting to the proper medical care topic. I wrote one post that I thought was quite gentle, where I told her that me and everyone else just wanted what was best for her and that if she had given up natural healing in favor of conventional medicine, that it was okay and that no one would judge her. She (or her “team”) deleted it. But boy I got a lot of flack from her followers for that one. Oh, and it turned out that as I wrote that she WAS going to a regular oncologist. Sigh.

    My own theory is that when you believe is stuff like the mind being able to cure the body of disease, that you are terrified of having, and implementing, a “plan B”. It’s like you’re telling your body to give up on healing itself or something. Maybe someone who understands this nonsense better than me can explain it. Her followers were just so disturbed at the thought of Jessica not doing only natural medicine. I think that people who steadfastly follow someone like Jessica simply have a difficult time processing reality. (Not you A, you seem like you got it after a while). They want so desperately to believe in magic and miracles, that when someone points out that neither thing is real, they become grievously offended.

    There are no potions, magic, wishful thinking, faith healing, enemas, juices, meditations, prayers, organic burgers, positive thoughts, natural cosmetics, crystals, detoxes, edible clays, hair analysis, daily affirmations that cure cancer.

    There, and that list is not exhaustive.


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  47. 47
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    I think that people who steadfastly follow someone like Jessica simply have a difficult time processing reality. (Not you A, you seem like you got it after a while). They want so desperately to believe in magic and miracles, that when someone points out that neither thing is real, they become grievously offended.

    Which is why the proper term for these people isn’t ‘followers’ but rather ‘disciples’ with all the baggage that goes along with that label. It’s not just that they want to believe in magic and miracles, they also do not want to admit to themselves that they were conned. It is one thing to admit you were wrong, another altogether to admit to being stupid.


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  48. 48
    Peebs Says:

    I’ve been following this since DC’s original post. A lot of the comments on that were from alt meds just being ****ty and saying we’re horrible people.

    It’s quite reassuring that a lot of those people are now open minded enough to admit they were wrong.


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  49. 49
    Rose Says:

            Peebs said:

    I’ve been following this since DC’s original post. A lot of the comments on that were from alt meds just being ****ty and saying we’re horrible people.

    It’s quite reassuring that a lot of those people are now open minded enough to admit they were wrong.

    So many acted like we were going to CAUSE her death by pointing out that she had terminal cancer that could not be cured using the methods she was using. At least one person wrote “happy now?” on the previous article, which was baffling to me as I thought that he should have written that to the people at the Gerson clinic.

    I have never been a person who could understand religion and spirituality, so perhaps I am not really one to comment on this, but it just SEEMED to me at least, that many of Jessica’s disciples truly and honestly believed that somehow those of us who spoke out against Gerson were (somehow) causing Jessica’s cancer to grow. Am I the only one who felt that way? I guess it made sense to them if they believe that positive thoughts stop cancer then somehow negative thoughts (by a third party on another continent) cause cancer? Was that it? Again, I am not religious and I completely lack that part of the brain that processes magical thinking so maybe I am totally wrong about all this, but that was the impression that I was under. The “happy now?” comment really brought it home to me.

    It is early Monday morning in Australia right now and I am hopeful that today a lot of people with cancer are going to make appointments to see a real oncologist this day.


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  50. 50
    Jason Says:

            Rose said:

    So At least one person wrote “happy now?” on the previous article, which was baffling to me as I thought that he should have written that to the people at the Gerson clinic.

    Did they even read the article?

    When it was written three years ago, the author closed it with a personal letter to Jessica, which, to paraphrase said “There may still be time to save your life. I don’t want you to die. Please, please, go back to the real doctors and take their advice, because you will die if you don.t”

    I don’t see how it could possibly be more direct. No, he did not want her to die.


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  51. 51
    Peg Says:

            DV82XL said:

    How dare you? No one here is happy she is dead.

    We do know what killed her. Stupidity.

    Idiots like you can try and spin this and twist and prevaricate, but if this person had listened to real doctors she would be alive today. Yes she would have been missing an arm, but she would have been alive. Her mom might have lived too if she hadn’t been talked into this nonsense, and if you read between the lines, Ainscough was feeling guilty about that too.

    This is a tragedy and a farce but if it is to have any meaning, demonstrating that ‘alternate’ medicine is a crock. Any other interpretation is trivializing her death.

    RESPONSE to Comment: “Her mom might have lived too if she hadn’t been talked into this nonsense”
    So you know for a FACT it was Jessica who talked her mom into following her way of life.
    TRUTH: It was Jessica’s mom who was the believer long before Jessica got sick. Jessica became the believer not her mother.
    So there was no GUILT between the lines to read. Just a broken heart from a young women who’s mother was the world to her.


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  52. 52
    IIMPP Says:

    Yep. She is dead. We lost a lovely and vibrant person who taught us how to thrive with cancer and how to live positive. It worked for her ffor many years but we all die sometimes and she died happy and with dignity and respect.

    ddon’t let that change anything for you. Continue to celebrate her death the way you do. Big victory for you guess. I hope someone you love gets cancer and dies so you will know how it feels.


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  53. 53
    Ceejay Says:

    Seriously!!! IMPP…..no one feels that way. No one is happy that she is gone. We all know that it is tragic for anyone to die, especially cancer. The problem we have is that she knew her cancer was coming back and did not inform anyone. She knew the Gerson didn’t work as she saw it in her mother and herself, and she still advocated for them, leading other desperate sufferers down the same path that she took which was not working. I do beleive her initial intentions were good, but when people specifically asked her about the arm she would never confess and give excuses. It got harder and harder to hide the arm. On her site a user asked this below:

    December 16, 2014 at 1:42 pm
    hi jess. i’ve followed you for several years and i’ve wondered if your cancer would get worse – based on what i saw you doing with your diet in particular. i’m gonna be honest with you with my only intention being to help you. everybody is entitled to their opinion based on their experience. i’ve always wondered if you read gerson’s original book (minus what charlotte added to the book). i honestly believe that if you cut back out all animal products, all added oils and fats (including flaxseed oil which i personally consider to be one of the most toxic of all oils) and most of the vitamin supplements you are taking except the B12 injections and iodine which i apply only to my skin because of it’s voltility (most vitamin supplements are toxic to the sick body as gerson said in his original book – and it’s something i have found in my own illness and it’s also discussed in the book called WHOLE – by Colin T Campbell), then i think you’d find that your heath would improve again. the flaxseed oil and most of the vitamin supplements are kicking your liver and bloodstream while they’re down. it’s not just the active ingredient in synthetic vitamin supplements that’s the problem, it’s all the fillers and other crap that was made in some factory probably in china with the cheapest ingredients they could source. many, many overt fat free or low fat, high fruit (and veggie) vegans have recovered from aggressive cancers – brain cancer etc etc etc. – without the use of synthetic vitamin supplementation and added oils. admiring the likes of david wolfe and reading about all the other stuff you had in your diet told me you were off the mark a tad. also, even thinking that a higher protein and fat diet could help you with your health (when you did that experiment) also told me that somehow you’d lost your way with what is scientifically proven as a diet for health recovery (i refer to caldwell esselstyn and colin T campbell’s work). i recommend you look up megan elizabeth, fullyraw kristina, raw synergy tv and even freelee the banana girl on youtube to see how these women look amazing and have overcome health issues and have needed minimal vitamin supplementation and virtually no oils to achieve that goal. anyways, good luck with your journey. leesa

    Does that sound like someone who is trying to harm. Actually it sounds like someone who is trying to help. I hope people aren’t brainwashed by Gerson and understand that it is a faulty program without facts and real data. I too was once a beleiver, but its clear that it doesn’t work as they CLAIM it does. No one blames Jessica for following the Gerson. I fault her for knowing the truth later and not being honest with her users….she omitted and still led those same people to beleive that it worked when in essence, it doesn’t.


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  54. 54
    Shafe Says:

            Ceejay said:


    i honestly believe that if you cut back out all animal products, all added oils and fats (including flaxseed oil which i personally consider to be one of the most toxic of all oils) and most of the vitamin supplements you are taking except the B12 injections and iodine which i apply only to my skin because of it’s voltility (most vitamin supplements are toxic to the sick body as gerson said in his original book – and it’s something i have found in my own illness and it’s also discussed in the book called WHOLE – by Colin T Campbell), then i think you’d find that your heath would improve again.

    Does that sound like someone who is trying to harm. Actually it sounds like someone who is trying to help.

    That sounds like someone who is even more whacked out than run-of-the-mill Gerson quacks and is blaming Ainscough’s inability to cure her cancer on being insufficiently austere. The gist is, “Gerson works… if you do it right… which you didn’t… so you’re dying.”


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  55. 55
    EndTheHateNow Says:

    She is dead. Her mother is dead.

    You hated her for her not paying into the massive pharma profits and for going with a natural and healthy life. She cost you money and you hate that. She told people that they had other options and you hate that.

    Now the person you hate is dead.

    Will that stop your hatred? It probably won’t. You can celebrate her death even as you keep hating her.

    Hate is toxic and will kill you, but you don’t care. Maybe we’ll celebrate when you die.


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  56. 56
    DV82XL Says:

    The only posters that evidenced any hatred through this whole sad affair have been those that will not accept the fact that this person died and did not have to. No one here is celebrating her death and making the claim that we are is mendacious to the extreme. Nor did we ‘win.’ Winning would have been that she saw the light soon enough to save her own life. This is a loss for us because reason did not prevail over lies, and we are sad and angry.


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  57. 57
    EndTheHateNow Says:

    The only reason you are angry is she didn’t spend her last years paying money to bit pharmaceutical and hospital companies. She spent her last years thriving and happy and not paying her life savings to the industries that you are paid from.

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.


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  58. 58
    drbuzz0 Says:

            EndTheHateNow said:

    The only reason you are angry is she didn’t spend her last years paying money to bit pharmaceutical and hospital companies. She spent her last years thriving and happy and not paying her life savings to the industries that you are paid from.

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.

    First, I do not make any money off of cancer therapy. I am not employed by the big pharmaceutical companies. I don’t have any direct investments in them (I might have some small ones through mutual funds)

    I think you might want to rethink your definition of “thrive”

    When this first started, a few years ago, she didn’t have any serious symtoms. She continued to live without any major pain or suffering for a couple of years. That’s what you’d expect. That’s not because of her nutrition. That’s the natural course of the disease.

    In her blog she rarely spoke about her exact symptoms, but she eluded to them and people had seen her in presentations and such.

    It seems that about three or four years ago, she lost most use of her arm. She had her hand in a constant position and wore a brace on it. A couple of years ago she wrote about how her arm had gotten swollen and was not receding. That sounds very unpleasant.

    She stopped blogging and making public appearances back in June. She wrote about how she had constant pain, was bedridden, was bleeding constantly from her armpit. It does not sound like it was very good. Sadly, that is how you expect the disease to progress. It likely got worse as it started to take over her torso.

    She was diagnosed with cancer 7 years ago. She had surgery and chemo and that bought her some time. About a year later, it came back. Then she went about five and a half years without treatment.

    She spent those years obsessing over her diet and giving herself enemas. Sounds… like it wasn’t so much fun. I mean, unless you just love enemas and stuff.

    Of those, the first two were probably not so bad. However, things got worse from there and reading about her condition toward the end really makes me feel very sad for anyone to go through that.

    She did apparently go back to an oncologist, in the end. I wish she had been more public about it, but she mentioned it. Hopefully they were able to help her with palative care and some industrial strength pain killers.

    One of the memorial pages says “She died drug free.” God, I hope that’s not the case. That would be merciless. I hope she actually had plenty of muscle relaxants, pain killers and that kind of thing at the end.


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  59. 59
    DV82XL Says:

            EndTheHateNow said:

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.

    You know the only reason these posters are spitting mad is that everything they believed in is exposed as a fraud by Ainscough’s death. They care nothing for the girl herself beyond the fact that she was the poster-child for their make-believe view of the world, and she let them down. They can’t bring themselves to blame her, so the lash out at the messenger. How typical of the deluded; how sad.

    As for karma, if you knew anything about what that concept meant, or truly believed in it, you wouldn’t be concerned about our balance sheet in that regard, but rather your own.


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  60. 60
    Rose Says:

    Please don’t let it be so that she went without drugs. When my grandma and grandpa died of cancer, we made damn sure that they went out on a nice and comfortable opiate high. I am extremely disturbed right now if this was the case.

    Jessica’s sycophants remind me of telling a small child that Santa isn’t real. Gerson therapy does not work at all and people with terminal cancer who leave it untreated die of terminal cancer. What truly surprises me is how many of them seemed surprised by her death, when it has been obvious to me that she has been very sick for quite some time.

    Oh, and since I know this is bound to come up, I want to clear something up about Gerson. Here I go; I am about to throw you Gersonites a really, big, juicy, non-vegan bone. If I were to accept that Gerson therapy works the way that you people claim it works, then I must also accept that it must be followed to the T, without any deviation whatsoever for two years straight, day in and day out. Everyone always says that the reason is does not work very well is due to user error. Well, okay then, even if all that is true then all that means is THAT IT DOES NOT FREAKING WORK. If it is impossible for a human being to follow with total compliance THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If just small deviations makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If one missed enema makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If one non-organic orange makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK.

    If a human being in their imperfect form cannot follow the protocol (and apparently none can), then it does not work. It does not matter if it works in theory, if it cannot be carried out in practice THEN IT DOES NOT WORK.


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  61. 61
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    You know the only reason these posters are spitting mad is that everything they believed in is exposed as a fraud by Ainscough’s death. They care nothing for the girl herself beyond the fact that she was the poster-child for their make-believe view of the world, and she let them down. They can’t bring themselves to blame her, so the lash out at the messenger. How typical of the deluded; how sad.

    As for karma, if you knew anything about what that concept meant, or truly believed in it, you wouldn’t be concerned about our balance sheet in that regard, but rather your own.

    Only uneducated, immature narcissists talk about karma. It is the (asinine) go-to “argument” for a person who has felt slighted when they have no cause to be. If any of Jessica’s disciples want to lay out a clear and logical argument in defense of what happened to Jessica, then I am waiting with bated breath over here. So far, all I have seen is calling us meanies and telling us that karma will get us.

    Actually go right ahead and let karma come for me. All I have ever said about this woman and Gerson will only ultimately lead to good. My conscience is clear.


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  62. 62
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Only uneducated, immature narcissists talk about karma. It is the (asinine) go-to “argument” for a person who has felt slighted when they have no cause to be.

    I tend to agree but when I wrote if they knew anything about it, I meant Karma as the fundamental doctrine in Buddhism wherein it is the law of moral causation. If they really were to believe in it as an element of faith, they, not us bear the price for actions leading to Ainscough’s death.

    Now I am a rabid atheist, and no more believe in Karma then I believe in Grace (the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings) but it is still ironic that the poster should claim we have a lien on our souls over this and they don’t.


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  63. 63
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    I tend to agree but when I wrote if they knew anything about it, I meant Karma as the fundamental doctrine in Buddhism wherein it is the law of moral causation. If they really were to believe in it as an element of faith, they, not us bear the price for actions leading to Ainscough’s death.

    Now I am a rabid atheist, and no more believe in Karma then I believe in Grace (the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings) but it is still ironic that the poster should claim we have a lien on our souls over this and they don’t.

    I assure you that you know more about karma then anyone who actually believes in it. Most of them could not even come up with which religion originated the concept. But, hey, Karma! You big meanie!

    We have done nothing wrong and everything we have stood for here on this blog over the years will only lead to good. I am VERY PROUD of everyone who came here and spoke out against quackery. I have nothing but respect for Depleted Cranium and Pip Cornwall especially. These two people have put in their own time and effort to combat the Gerson scam. Pip Cornwall especially posts all over the internet and he takes a lot of abuse and he is still relentless in spreading the word of people getting (and deserving) proper medical care. Pip, I think you deserve a lot of respect and you have ALL my respect. The people fooled by quackery insult you when I know that it is you who truly helps people with cancer, and not the charlatans who lie and scam people when they are at their most vulnerable.


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  64. 64
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Rose said:

    Please don’t let it be so that she went without drugs. When my grandma and grandpa died of cancer, we made damn sure that they went out on a nice and comfortable opiate high. I am extremely disturbed right now if this was the case.

    One of the sites that memorialized her said she died “drug free.” I don’t know if they just mean cancer drugs or what. But for the sake of basic humanity and mercy do really hope she had some pain killers at the end.

    Some more good information and analysis can be found here:

    http://www.mamamia.com.au/wellbeing/jess-ainscough-died-of-cancer-this-week/

    This is written by Dr. David Gorski. I know Dr. Gorski and he’s a very competent cancer doctor with a great deal of experience the issues of “alternative” cancer treatment. (Obviously he’s been called a shill for the big pharmaceutical companies more than a few times.)

    He was one of the doctors I talked to when I wrote the first article and asked him about the potential course of the illness.

    He has an interesting take on what killed her. We know it was almost certainly cancer. Dr. Gorski seems to think it probably was an instance of the cancer getting so bad that it erupted from the skin and caused constant blood loss and that this could have also lead to sepsis.

    That’s one way it could have killed her. Another is that it spread beyond her arm and caused respiratory or circulatory problems. Actually, there are many ways that it ultimately could have killed her. Unfortunately, they are all very unpleasant. This is not like dying of a heart attack in your sleep, unfortunately.


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  65. 65
    drbuzz0 Says:

    http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-gerson-protocol-and-the-death-of-jess-ainscough/


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  66. 66
    Jennifer Says:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry. U want money. U got it. But u are not going fool nobody.

    She lived because she made the right choice. She lived seven years. I kno ppl who have one on chemo and died in a year and that should tell you something. She died because she strated chemo like the doctors had told her to. Chemo=death. Cancer has never killed anyone. It’s not a disease. It is a sign of ur body needs more nutrients. Ppl die from lack of nutrients + from chemo which is POISON.

    Follow your own advice and you will end up with cancer. I hope you do.

    Some1 already said Karma. Just wait. When u do get cancer we’ll laugh at you when chemo kills you too.

    Jsesica is in heaven. But U will burn in hell.


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  67. 67
    Greg Says:

    Hi. I am a med school student studying, and I realize med school students often seem to think they know it all before we’ve actually completed training.

    I have to say, though, reading the first post about her it was painfully spot on.

    This was a really simple situation. If nothing was done to stop the cancer it would do what cancer does and it would grow and grow and stop when it killed her. It seems to me like it is not a concept that is too complex for the average person to understand. cancer does not (or at least very rarely) just stops on its own. Organic juice and coffee enemas are never going to stop a growing tumor. You have limited options to stop it before it kills.

    Reading it is heartbreaking because it was so obvious to everyone but her. Part of me feels like if there had just been the right person to talk some sense into her she might be alive. They would not have suggested amputating her arm if they didn’t have good reason to believe it would have saved her life.

    It makes me wonder were there anyone around her who could see through this? Didn’t she have any family or friends who could sit her down and tell her she was going to die if she continued?


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  68. 68
    LouV Says:

            Jennifer said:

    She lived because she made the right choice. She lived seven years. I kno ppl who have one on chemo and died in a year and that should tell you something.

    Except that she didn’t simply have “cancer”. She had a specific cancer with slow progression & detected early, while some other types of cancer progress faster or are diagnosed too late. So your examples are not helpful.
    This is why we talk about this sad case. People advertised her situation as evidence that Gerson could work for a lot of people. We, on the other hand, are discussing her not to say that her death invalidates Gerson (that’s what clinical trials already did), but to say that publicized success stories are not good evidence.

    As for the other parts of your comment… I don’t even know where to begin.
    Just learn what a clinical trial is and why we need them. Then look for the ones who have been done for Gerson


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  69. 69
    DV82XL Says:

            Jennifer said:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry.

    You’re right it is about money no one on this site collects any for what we write. But the fact is that everything you can say about real medicine making money from those with cancer, applies equally to those that sell alternate treatments. So even if we were to make the unwarranted presumption these latter were effective, those offering them are just as much in business to sell product as the former.


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  70. 70
    Dave G Says:

    sad, but yes, predictable. It does not take a genius to grasp the concept that if you have cancer and do nothing about it that it will probably kill you. I know there is spontaneous remission, but that is super rare for any cancer that has gotten very far.

    I do not understand how people can believe this bs. The main part of this treatment regime, besides a lot of fruit juisce is putting coffee in your butt multiple times a day. seriously, who thinks that they have cancer in their arm and putting coffee in their anus is going to cure that?

    It’s not even “natural” either. In what natural, pre-industrial setting did humans brew up coffee and then stick a tube in their anus and pour the coffee in. That’s not something your body is designed to require. It’s nuts, quite frankly. how does anyone not see through that?


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  71. 71
    Karen Says:

    sadly, she was never thriving. her arm looked like hell two or three years ago and her hand was not of much use i think she could not fully articulate her fingers. On the bright side for her it was her left arm and she was right handed. It’s sad that the benefit of not doing what doctors told her was she got to keep an arm that ended up being of not much use and painful.

    People did try to convince her otherwise. She said that the Gerson therapy and the organic diet and detox regime were working and she actually would cite her worsening condition to prove it. she would say that the cancer was being drawn out or that it was a sign of her body releasing toxins. She also blamed some of the pain and swelling on her early surgery and chemo. There may have been some truth to that, because they did need to take out lymphnodes, but it can’t account for the fact that her arm clearly got worse and worse until last year when it was so bad she couldn’t just wear long shirts and turn it away from the camera anymore.

    She also said that she would ‘do what works” and that she would go back to doctors if what she was doing didn’t work. She thought it worked. It was too late when it became impossible to ignore.

    She was surrounded by people she thought were being positive by constantly patting her on the back and praising her for doing the right thing. A lot of seemingly positive supportive people who were yes men and yes women who made suer she was told it was going great. I think she liked the attention.

    I used to work for a publicist who worked on some of her engagements and promo things. I met her at events a couple of times. People gushed over what a great thing she was doing. some of them fans and some her people.

    Money was made for sure. I don’t mean her treatments, but I am sure they did too. Her website and market affiliation and her magazine articles and speaking engagements and the events she was at. There were many fingers in the pot and plenty of books and mags and things being sold.

    I am sure she made good money too even after everyone took their cut. It is stupid to talk about her making money as if she was just in it for money because I do think she believed it. You can’t take your money to the grave, so there is no point.


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  72. 72
    Matthew Says:

            Jennifer said:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry. U want money. U got it. But u are not going fool nobody.

    Cancer is also a money loser for the pharma industry. If it was to simply disappear tomorrow, their profits would go through the roof. The ideal pharma patient is someone who is basically healthy, picking up minor chronic issues (arthritis, angina, COPD, heart disease, etc) as they get older. 20 years of heart pressure and arthritis meds represent *way* more money than a course of chemo.


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  73. 73
    Rose Says:

    Most of us who are fortunate enough to live in a first world country will likely die of cancer or heart disease. Both are conditions that people are more likely to get as they get older and both are difficult to treat, not because they actually know the cure and suppressing it. Fortunately we have made a lot of progress and so many cancers are now survivable. If you live in Australia or the United States, and most of the people you have known who died, died of cancer, then that speaks volumes about how fantastic our medical care is. Most people in these two countries can expect to live long enough to eventually die from cancer. It was horrifying for us to see someone die at the age of 30, but that used to happen all the time, before we made progress in treating disease. So many people who come here and bash conventional medicine are alive today because of it. You’re spoiled and lower-end thinkers so you take it for granted that you survived childbirth, or that you got those antibiotics as a child, but that is all the just result of science and conventional medicine.


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  74. 74
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    You’re spoiled and lower-end thinkers …

    Christopher Booker described wishful thinking in terms of he called “the fantasy cycle”:

    ” When we embark on a course of action which is unconsciously driven by wishful thinking, all may seem to go well for a time, in what may be called the ‘dream stage’. But because this make-believe can never be reconciled with reality, it leads to a ‘frustration stage’ as things start to go wrong, prompting a more determined effort to keep the fantasy in being. As reality presses in, it leads to a ‘nightmare stage’ as everything goes wrong, culminating in an ‘explosion into reality’, when the fantasy finally falls apart”.

    This is exactly what occurred here, and why Ainscough’s disciples are in such a state of rage. There is no reasoning with them at this point, and really no need – reality is rubbing their faces in their error, and there is not a damned thing they can do about it. They can twist and prevaricate all they want. They can fling petulant accusations and rail at us all they want questioning our motives, but in the end they know that they are wrong and everything that follows is just a pathetic attempt to salve their wounded egos.


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  75. 75
    Rose Says:

            Greg said:

    Hi. I am a med school student studying, and I realize med school students often seem to think they know it all before we’ve actually completed training.

    I have to say, though, reading the first post about her it was painfully spot on.

    This was a really simple situation. If nothing was done to stop the cancer it would do what cancer does and it would grow and grow and stop when it killed her. It seems to me like it is not a concept that is too complex for the average person to understand. cancer does not (or at least very rarely) just stops on its own. Organic juice and coffee enemas are never going to stop a growing tumor. You have limited options to stop it before it kills.

    Reading it is heartbreaking because it was so obvious to everyone but her. Part of me feels like if there had just been the right person to talk some sense into her she might be alive. They would not have suggested amputating her arm if they didn’t have good reason to believe it would have saved her life.

    It makes me wonder were there anyone around her who could see through this? Didn’t she have any family or friends who could sit her down and tell her she was going to die if she continued?

    Well, her mother was deep into woo long before Jessica got cancer. That right there likely sealed her fate. When you are 22 years old, it is often your mother who is the voice of reason and wisdom in your life. The fact that Sharyn Ainscough was a “magical thinker” is something that I think really, truly had a profound effect on Jessica. Her mother quit her job just so she could help Jessica get through Gerson. Her father grew organic vegetables for her. Obviously, their hearts were in the right place, but they were her number one enablers and I do not think she had much hope to ever get real medical care because of this.

    Also, Jessica eventually had thousands and thousands of people cheering her on. If Jessica ever had any doubts, there was ALWAYS someone there to quash them. Her original oncologists were the only people in her life who told her the truth and who offered her real hope of a normal lifespan, and she rejected them. There were people like me, Rosalie, Orac, and DC, who sent her messages and letters imploring her to get proper medical care, but she never responded. I wrote on her facebook page, telling her that no one would judge her if she went conventional, and though one person there supported me, the rest shouted me down and thread was deleted.

    I fee like I have been watching a train wreck in slow motion for the past few years.


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  76. 76
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    Christopher Booker described wishful thinking in terms of he called “the fantasy cycle”:

    ” When we embark on a course of action which is unconsciously driven by wishful thinking, all may seem to go well for a time, in what may be called the ‘dream stage’. But because this make-believe can never be reconciled with reality, it leads to a ‘frustration stage’ as things start to go wrong, prompting a more determined effort to keep the fantasy in being. As reality presses in, it leads to a ‘nightmare stage’ as everything goes wrong, culminating in an ‘explosion into reality’, when the fantasy finally falls apart”.

    This is exactly what occurred here, and why Ainscough’s disciples are in such a state of rage. There is no reasoning with them at this point, and really no need – reality is rubbing their faces in their error, and there is not a damned thing they can do about it. They can twist and prevaricate all they want. They can fling petulant accusations and rail at us all they want questioning our motives, but in the end they know that they are wrong and everything that follows is just a pathetic attempt to salve their wounded egos.

    You nailed it. That is exactly what is going on here. Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die. How many here have told us that we are going to hell? Or that karma will get us? They all seemed so sure that Jessica would survive and that they were going to prove us wrong. I mean, that makes no sense to me. The woman had terminal cancer.

    I had never heard the term “fantasy cycle” before but now that I see it in black and white, I can think of at least one person I know who lives her entire life like this. Knowing her I can rather confidently say that we are wasting our energy trying to explain to Jessica’s sycophants the reality and truth of what happened here. They would have to give up the way they live their entire lives in order to process it and that would simply be too painful.


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  77. 77
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die.

    For the record, I am not the blog owner, nor did I post the lead article, that would be Steve Packard (drbuzz0.) My name is Robert Gauthier, and I post comments here as DV82XL.


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  78. 78
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    For the record, I am not the blog owner, nor did I post the lead article, that would be Steve Packard (drbuzz0.) My name is Robert Gauthier, and I post comments here as DV82XL.

    Sorry I mix you two up. Well either way, I have been accused of being evil and uncaring because I said that Jessica was going to die. Thinking of them as the kind of people who live life according to fantasy cycles though, this is all starting to make sense to me. Now obviously no one can cause another person to die just by saying that they are going to die, but so many of Jessica’s supporters have written posts here that leads me to believe that they truly believe that. I think what is really going on is that by pointing out the truth, we are briefly taking them out of their fantasy cycle, something which is deeply distressful to them. Several of them seemed legitimately taken off guard by Jessica’s death, even though she has been on an obvious decline for many months now. They have decided to lash out at us because we were the first ones to briefly remove them from the world of fantasy and back into the world of reality. Earlier I said it was like telling a small child that Santa is not real. I think I was describing the fantasy cycle without realizing it.


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  79. 79
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Well either way, I have been accused of being evil and uncaring because I said that Jessica was going to die.

    It’s easy to demonize the cranky Cassandras and make them the problem, because they make people uncomfortable. But if the consequences of bad ideas are not held up to the placid mob, and if everyone is being Mr and Mrs Nice and reassuring fools that they’re still good people no matter what rubbish they might believe in, where is the motivation to change?


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  80. 80
    Ceejay Says:

    The more and more I read about Jessica the sadder I get. There was an article on:

    http://www.maketheworldmove.com/stop-wishing-for-things-to-be-different-by-jessica-ainscough-make-the-world-move/

    Her exact comments were:

    “As a result of the chemo I had on my arm four years ago, my left hand and arm is pretty damaged. I have next to no strength in it and my left middle finger is fused at the knuckle and curled over into my palm. Hence why I don’t like flat-handed yoga postures. I simply can’t do them, and it leaves me feeling incredibly frustrated.

    On top of that, each year around this time I usually find myself wishing for things to be different. I wish that I could swim in the ocean (a no-no for Gerson Therapy people). While I don’t like to admit it, seeing as I preach the wellness word so strongly, I also wish that I could celebrate the holidays and new year with a few drinks. I wish that I could eat, drink and be festively merry with all of my friends. But I can’t. My desire to be loyal to the healthiest, best version of me is far stronger than my desire to get hammered.

    I’m still going to continue visualising my arm strong and pain-free, but I’m going to stop cursing at it every time it holds me back from doing things I think I should be able to do. If nothing else, the restrictions my arm imposes keep me humble, the pain keeps me present, and the scars are signs of the strength my body has shown over the past few years. The fact that my arm is still attached to my body – despite doctors telling me it had to be chopped off – is a constant reminder of my resilience.”

    Her commitment to the Gerson protocol 4 years later sounds so cultish and restrictive. Its such a sad way to live. I hate that someone so young put herself through so much and convinced herself that if she deviated anyway or anyhow that she would have failed. When ultimately Gerson failed her completely.

    Its a sad and tragic way to live and the Gerson folks should be truly ashamed. I really hope they stop with the scamming. I understand Jessica chose her own path, but to be made to feel guilty for living is crazy. Those folks should be shut down completely!

    Its sad and frustrating.


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  81. 81
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Rose said:

    You nailed it. That is exactly what is going on here. Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die. How many here have told us that we are going to hell? Or that karma will get us? They all seemed so sure that Jessica would survive and that they were going to prove us wrong. I mean, that makes no sense to me. The woman had terminal cancer.

    Yes. It is my blog and a few people have asked if I am no longer blogging or why I am not commenting as much. I just happen to have about three major things going on in life right now plus some other things that have occupied me the past month and will continue to until around April. (Big work project among other things)

    I cannot stress enough that I did not want this woman to die nor did I wish to come out as smug or preachy when I said she would die. I said it so bluntly to both counter the ridiculous claims she was being healed and even to try to maybe get her attention.

    I have taken no joy in seeing her condition deteriorate nor seeing her mother die. When her mother died, I did briefly hope it would shock Jessica to reality and maybe there would be time to save her.

    This is not good, but I also think that we should not avoid the topic of her death. It needs to be publicized, because the failures of these therapies get way too little press. Occasionally someone survives with alternative therapy only, and when they do, it’s often a case of misdiagnosis to begin with or even spontaneous remission, but that gets lots of press.

    People turn away from real medicine to things like Gerson therapy and they did. They die all the time. It needs to be out there. When people turn to Google to try to research what therapy to use for their cancer, I want them to see the fact that there are people dying because they believed in this crap.


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  82. 82
    DV82XL Says:

    The Guardian weights in:

    Jess Ainscough’s tragic death is all too familiar for oncologists. We’ve all lost patients to the ‘secret powers’ of alternative therapy.

    Research shows that nearly 70% of cancer patients and a staggering 90% of patients enrolled in an early phase clinical trial use alternative therapies. We now know that many of these therapies are not only unhelpful but are downright dangerous. Herbs and supplements can interact with chemotherapy and reduce its efficacy, a real drawback when therapy is given with curative intent.”


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  83. 83
    K Says:

    I don’t think you’re a heartless person, but by posting this you do sound like one.

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    I’m myself am undergoing cancer treatment and I had to sign a form at the oncologist’s office that “I understand that Surgery, Medication and other forms of treatment are not an exact science”! The jury’s still out on this one. The fact remains that there’s no clear understanding of many types of cancer nor there are any scientifically proven treatment; if there was then everyone would be taking that route. Presently the cause of cancer is unknown, and it’s a statistical outlier with no clear way to treat it. That’s why many resort to alternative therapies in addition to or in place of conventional treatment. Mine’s stage 4 with doctors giving me zero hope. If alternative therapies at least offer me some mental solace, what’s wrong with it?

    It’s well proven that a healthy emotional state improves immune system (look up “Mind over Medicine” by Lissa Rankin”). I agree that people should still seek out conventional treatment. But to completely ignore the merits of alternative therapies without conventional treatments being scientifically proven, seems very biased and illogical. Truth’s not always black or white, it’s often a shade of gray. There’s place for both conventional as well as alternative treatments.

    May her soul rest in peace. Let’s not use her death to promote any agenda. The fact remains that as of date, almost all treatments for cancer (including surgery and mainstream medicine) are scientifically unproven, and people should use combination of all treatments to help themselves heal. Peace.


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  84. 84
    Bryan Says:

    She did die, as you, the author predicted, but she took 7 years from first diagnosis and 3 years from your prediction to die. Does this surprise you? Did she take more or less time than you expected?


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  85. 85
    Rose Says:

            K said:

    I don’t think you’re a heartless person, but by posting this you do sound like one.

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    I’m myself am undergoing cancer treatment and I had to sign a form at the oncologist’s office that “I understand that Surgery, Medication and other forms of treatment are not an exact science”! The jury’s still out on this one. The fact remains that there’s no clear understanding of many types of cancer nor there are any scientifically proven treatment; if there was then everyone would be taking that route. Presently the cause of cancer is unknown, and it’s a statistical outlier with no clear way to treat it. That’s why many resort to alternative therapies in addition to or in place of conventional treatment. Mine’s stage 4 with doctors giving me zero hope. If alternative therapies at least offer me some mental solace, what’s wrong with it?

    It’s well proven that a healthy emotional state improves immune system (look up “Mind over Medicine” by Lissa Rankin”). I agree that people should still seek out conventional treatment. But to completely ignore the merits of alternative therapies without conventional treatments being scientifically proven, seems very biased and illogical. Truth’s not always black or white, it’s often a shade of gray. There’s place for both conventional as well as alternative treatments.

    May her soul rest in peace. Let’s not use her death to promote any agenda. The fact remains that as of date, almost all treatments for cancer (including surgery and mainstream medicine) are scientifically unproven, and people should use combination of all treatments to help themselves heal. Peace.

    The sign on your oncologist’s door is the exact point we have been trying to make here. I do not understand what is SO incredibly complicated about this. No one has The Cure for cancer. There are no shades of gray here. Your oncologist offers you scientifically studied, evidence-based medicine. That does not mean that it will cure you, and your oncologist never claims that it does. What that medicine does for people depends on a lot of factors. In some cases, it works great and puts the cancer into remission. Some people get cancer at 40 and will die at 90. It works that good. In some cases, there is not much conventional medicine can do. They have little in the way of treatment for your cancer, but what they can offer you is palliation, and it can make your final months and days so much more comfortable than no treatment at all.

    Again, since this appears to go over everyone’s head, let me repeat it: conventional medicine has never once claimed it has The Cure for cancer; all it claims to do is give the the best evidence-based treatment it can.

    Woo flingers are lying sacks of crap who tell you that they do have a cure for cancer. But according to people like you, because conventional medicine can not promise a good outcome, it is a respectable “alternative” to go to the lying sacks of crap for “treatment”. Seriously? So if conventional medicine is not perfect, then alternative medicine must therefore be a viable option? WTF? Really? The only reason people get any sort of “mental solace” from alternative medicine is because the person selling it to them is LYING. That “mental solace” soon becomes frustration, anger and guilt.

    Here is the sad reality of the times we live in: we do not have a clear-cut cure for cancer. That means that a lot of us are going to die of cancer. There is very often little that can be about it. However, giving money, time and emotional energy to quackery is not the solution. I actually agree that people suffering from cancer probably do need a lot more psychological and emotional support than they get. But for that they need a real psychologist or counselor, and not some charlatan promising them that they can cure their cancer.

    Back to Jessica for a second here. Jessica had a very difficult cancer to treat. She had a terminal illness with very limited treatment options. This happens sometimes. Sometimes conventional medicine has little to offer a patient. In Jessica’s case, the only option that had a reasonable chance of significantly extending her lifespan was the amputation. I cannot stress enough that this was Jessica’s ONLY treatment option available. Once she rejected it, she was guaranteed to die of epithelioid sarcoma. Again, once Jessica decided against the amputation, she was 100% going to die from her cancer within a few years (unless she got hit by a bus). There was no “alternative treatment”. The “alternative” to the amputation was a guaranteed death from cancer. Does that mean that conventional treatment is perfect? Heck no. Does it mean that the amputation would for sure have been successful? Absolutely not. The conventional treatment was simply Jessica’s one and only hope of living a reasonably long life. It was not perfect, and indeed it was not even all that good. It simply was the only choice available to Jessica that would have NOT guaranteed a death from cancer. People keep saying that Jessica’s treatment options sucked, and they are completely correct. Her treatment options DID suck, but they were ALL THAT SHE HAD.

    Alternative therapies are not alternatives; they are just living a life with untreated cancer.


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  86. 86
    Rose Says:

            Bryan said:

    She did die, as you, the author predicted, but she took 7 years from first diagnosis and 3 years from your prediction to die. Does this surprise you? Did she take more or less time than you expected?

    It would be an average life expectancy for this kind of cancer, and keep in mind that she bought herself another year or so with the chemotherapy she got. Epithelioid sarcoma is a very slow-growing, yet relentless cancer. People live with it for years.

    But perhaps the author of the blog can answer this better.


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  87. 87
    LouV Says:

            K said:

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    And this is exactly the point of this article.
    The problem with Jess’s story and other “cancer success stories” is that they are often advertised as evidence of a therapy’s overall efficacy, when in fact personal anecdotes are very insufficient for this purpose.
    That’s what clinical trials are for, since they examine large numbers of people with far more strict criteria ; they won’t predict the outcome for a specific person with 100% certainty, but they allow for a comparison between therapies.
    And in Gerson’s case, it has been far less tested than conventional treatment, and when it was, the evidence wasn’t good. Not a good sign.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Gerson#Evidence

    So here the point is not “See ? Gerson doesn’t work.”
    It is “See ? Stop advertising cancer success stories as evidence.”


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  88. 88
    janeD Says:

    @Bryan #86 Look at Steve’s addendum to his original blog post:

    “UPDATE: SHE DIED ON FEBRUARY 26, 2015.
    It took about 3 years from the time this was published and seven years since the first diagnosis. That is roughly the time that one would have expected. She was 30 years old. Her loss is very sad.”

    http://depletedcranium.com/jessica-ainscough-is-going-to-die/


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  89. 89
    DV82XL Says:

    The problem with Jess’s story and other “cancer success stories” is that they are often advertised as evidence of a therapy’s overall efficacy, when in fact personal anecdotes are very insufficient for this purpose./quote]

    I know you are not supporting alternate medicine, but what sort of mental gymnastics do these people have to go through to spin Ainscough’s death into a ‘cancer success story’?


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  90. 90
    BMS Says:

            DV82XL said:

    … what sort of mental gymnastics do these people have to go through to spin Ainscough’s death into a ‘cancer success story’?

    Not much. “Mental” hardly enters the equation. They’re trying to appeal to the heart, not the mind. It doesn’t have to be logical. It doesn’t have to be coherent.


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  91. 91
    LouV Says:

    @DV82XL #89
    I didn’t mean that her death was now spun into a “cancer success story” (although I have seen some say that she supposedly lived longer than patients on conventional treatment ; but it seems much much more complicated that that).
    I meant that BEFORE her death, she was paraded as living proof of the efficacy of the therapy.
    I was reacting to the people saying : “She died, but it isn’t proof that Gerson doesn’t work ; after all, what do you have to say about people who die while following conventional therapy ?”
    To that I answer : Exactly, glad we agree on that ! So why don’t we stop advertising success stories altogether, and rely instead on CT for all therapies ?


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  92. 92
    DV82XL Says:

    I understand LouV my remarks were parenthetic, and I know I was quoting you out of context.


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  93. 93
    DV82XL Says:

    If anything good come from this it is that the wheels seem to be falling off Belle Gibson (she of the so-called Gibson Therapy) that Ainscough believed would cure her.

    It would seem Charity money promised by ‘inspirational’ health app developer Belle Gibson not handed over

    and

    Belle Gibson, whose story of miraculous survival from terminal cancer helped launch a global “health and wellness” business, has admitted that her claim of suffering multiple life-threatening cancers may be false.

    Exposed by our own commenter Rose on her own blog Reality Based Medicine there is a veritable laundry list of BS emerging from a closer look at Gibson


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  94. 94
    Ted Says:

    All of you, including the OP, who are sanctimoniously claiming that Ms. Ainscough’s choice of therapy “killed” her are woefully ignorant of statistics. From the article linked in the original post:

    “epithelioid sarcoma is a rare sarcoma, with an incidence on the order of 0.1 to 0.4 per million. It’s primarily a tumor of young adults, and it nearly always appears on the upper extremities, and wide surgical excision is the only known effective treatment. It also tends to be indolent as well. Its ten year survival overall is on the order of 61% …”

    Let’s see:
    1. she did have surgery and chemo but the cancer recurred
    2. Her death after 7 years is in no way an outlier given the quoted 10 year survival.

    The only “scientific” way to say that her treatment affected her survival would be a double-blind study with enough cases to give possible statistical significance to her slight deviation from the mean value. And that ain’t going to happen because there is no money in alternative treatments.

    So, I think the many posters here stating the obvious are obviously correct. You are happy to be using her case to confirm your scientism.


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  95. 95
    Anon Says:

            Ted said:

    And that ain’t going to happen because there is no money in alternative treatments.

    Hahahahahahaha.

    You do realise that quackery is a multi-billion dollar industry?


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  96. 96
    LouV Says:

    @ Ted : then you should tell your bit about statistics to her fans who thought that a 7 year survival anecdote was proof of Gerson’s efficacy. They’re the ones who have problems with statistics.
    Moreover, where did you see the OP say that her death wasn’ t an outlier ?
    “It was 2012 when I predicted this outcome, noting that the slow moving cancer would likely take a few more years to kill her. It took about three. To be perfectly honest, that’s roughly what I had expected, based on what doctors had told me and some research on the progression of the condition.”


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  97. 97
    Ted Says:

            Anon said:

    Hahahahahahaha.

    You do realise that quackery is a multi-billion dollar industry?

    What is the source for your claim?

    While you are looking this up, you might want to search for the stock market cap of some big pharma companies, all of whom make $billions from cancer treatment:
    Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) $276 billion
    Pfizer (PFE) $207 billion
    Merck (MRK) $160 billion

    source: yahoo finance


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  98. 98
    Ted Says:

            LouV said:

    @ Ted : then you should tell your bit about statistics to her fans who thought that a 7 year survival anecdote was proof of Gerson’s efficacy. They’re the ones who have problems with statistics.

    Yes, I suppose I do number myself among her fans, as I am for any of God’s children who are facing terrible adversity

    Moreover, where did you see the OP say that her death wasn’ t an outlier ?

    How about the title of his post?
    As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her UNTREATED Cancer

    That sure says to me that he is convinced that the lack of treatment killed her when the statistics I quoted in no way to support that assertion.


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  99. 99
    Ted Says:

    in no way support …


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  100. 100
    Peebs Says:

    Sorry Ted, alt meds do not peddle their wares out of altruism;

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/alternative-medicine-is-a-34-billion-industry-but-only-one-third-of-the-treatments-have-been-tested-879411/


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  101. 101
    Shafe Says:

            Ted said:

    From the article linked in the original post:

    “epithelioid sarcoma is a rare sarcoma, with an incidence on the order of 0.1 to 0.4 per million. It’s primarily a tumor of young adults, and it nearly always appears on the upper extremities, and wide surgical excision is the only known effective treatment. It also tends to be indolent as well. Its ten year survival overall is on the order of 61% …”

    Excuse me while I post the remainder of the paragraph that you excerpted above, with emphasis added:

    …, and for patients between 17 and 30 years (i.e., patients like Jessica Ainscough), it’s approximately 72%. Of course, that is with treatment with surgery; without surgery, five year survival is 35% and ten year survival is 33%. Sadly, Jess Ainscough’s survival of seven years with her disease in essence untreated is thus within the expected range of survival time based on her disease that I discussed the last time I discussed her. -Orac

            Ted said:

    Let’s see:
    1. she did have surgery and chemo but the cancer recurred
    2. Her death after 7 years is in no way an outlier given the quoted 10 year survival.

            Ted said:

    How about the title of his post?
    As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her UNTREATED Cancer

    That sure says to me that he is convinced that the lack of treatment killed her when the statistics I quoted in no way to support that assertion.

    Read that again: “…wide surgical excision is the only known effective treatment.” The “wide surgical excision” would likely have been a forequarter amputation leaving her with no left arm or shoulder. Ainscough underwent some experimental chemotherapy with disappointing results, then refused the amputation, shunned medical treatment altogether, and opted instead for Gerson Therapy. She died predictably after she let the cancer go untreated.

    So no, her death was not an outlier. She died just as the statistics state that most untreated patients would.


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