If you can contribute to a congressional campaign, now would be the time.

July 2nd, 2013
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Do you support nuclear energy? Do you think the US government should not have unlimited powers to spy on its people? Do you think that the rise of biotech and technologies like 3D printers requires revamping of intellectual property laws in a way that avoids being overly restrictive toward end users? Do you want to see the US start funding big science programs again?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, I hope you will consider making a contribution to my campaign for the US Congress.

You must be a US citizen or permanent resident.


Contributions can be made here.

PLEASE NOTE THAT IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO SO, NOW IS ABSOLUTELY THE TIME TO DO IT.

Recently I have received word that another candidate has started fund raising in the district and this makes NOW a very important time.   In the next days and weeks, I will be going to committees and talking to potential big contributors, PAC’s and the media.   The candidate who has the largest number of contributors and the highest amount of money raised will always be regarded as the leader and will have a much easier time getting endorsements and contributions.   In other words, if a candidate fails to get some support at this critical moment, they will fall behind and never be able to catch up.  Conversely, if they get more than the other candidate, they will become the presumptive nominee and it will be easy for them to get more funding in the near future.

Even small contributions help.   Yes, your ten dollars DOES MAKE A DIFFERENCE.  Of course, more makes an even bigger difference.


This entry was posted on Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013 at 3:14 pm and is filed under personal, Politics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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16 Responses to “If you can contribute to a congressional campaign, now would be the time.”

  1. 1
    DV82XL Says:

    Steve,

    To be honest I find your run for congress a bit frustrating in that I cannot offer you as much help as I would like to, mostly due to the limits of geography. I am at loose ends, and I have some experience in electoral politics and I think I could be an asset to your campaign. Since that’s not going to happen, I will give you some free advice, to ignore or delete from this thread as you see fit.

    While Depleted Cranium is a fine and well regarded blog the fact that it is so far reaching is more of a hindrance than an asset to you in this case. Many like me cannot vote, or contribute in any meaningful way, and indeed some well-intentioned reader may run you afoul with the law without knowing. As well it is unlikely that a critical number of voters in your district read, or even know this blog exists.

    On the other hand you are a very good essayist (in need of a good editor mind, but aren’t we all) and you could probably reach more of the people that count with a blog devoted to local issues. I’m sure there is plenty of material that you could make hay with unless where you live is utterly different than anywhere else on the planet. It would probably be best if it wasn’t obviously a ‘vote-for-me’ type of effort as much as an ‘isn’t this stupid’ page like DC is. Once this is established it is relatively easy to get some local buzz happening because people really like to have a place to rant and vent. And the topics can be quite pedestrian compared to what you offer here, the point anyway is to start a dialog of any sort because that’s what starts the juices flowing. Not everyone needs to care that much about any of the issues actually but they will care that someone appears to be listening, and that is pure political gold come ballot time.

    In short while I am sure you would like to use this blog as a bully-pulpit having taken so long to develop it I worry that you are mostly shouting into the wind here and your efforts would be better utilized on something local.

    Just my thoughts.

    Rob


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  2. 2
    BMS Says:

    “All politics is local” — Tip O’Neill


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  3. 3
    drbuzz0 Says:

            DV82XL said:

    In short while I am sure you would like to use this blog as a bully-pulpit having taken so long to develop it I worry that you are mostly shouting into the wind here and your efforts would be better utilized on something local.

    That’s true to some extent and I do not post a whole lot about it on this blog, at least not relative to what I am doing in terms of effort expended.

    But it’s still a venue at my disposal and worth using once in a while.

    For one thing, posting on here is free and easy, so even if I get a single contribution or volunteer or something, it’s a high return ratio compared to other media.

    No, I’m not using DC very much for this, but worth a shot now and then.


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  4. 4
    Matte Says:

    Wish I could endorse, aid or support your efforts in any meaningful way but you would run foul with the law if I did so…

    As we are discussing politics, I am very curious about the whole Snowden dilemma and how it is presented in the States (your opinion would be interesting to hear too). The media here in Europe is not providing much of an insight on what is thought no this topic in the states!?


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  5. 5
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Matte said:

    Wish I could endorse, aid or support your efforts in any meaningful way but you would run foul with the law if I did so…

    As we are discussing politics, I am very curious about the whole Snowden dilemma and how it is presented in the States (your opinion would be interesting to hear too). The media here in Europe is not providing much of an insight on what is thought no this topic in the states!?

    It’s a big deal and is being presented different ways by different media. I would say that after the initial stories, most of the media is presenting it in a factual and neutral way. Saying things like “Snowden is believed to still be in Russia. The US is asking countries for his extradition. ”

    Here is my take:

    The vast majority of US legislators say he should be tried for crimes such as treason.

    I do not buy it at all. I will come sort of calling him a hero, because I do not know his intentions or motives.

    What he did was a violation of the law and his orders as a government contractor. However, it was established many times, including at the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunals that adherence to orders and duty is NOT the ultimate duty when someone is faced with a highly unethical and illegal order.

    Snowden revealed the program and undermined a government program that was highly unethical, went against all that the United States is supposed to stand for and, in my opinion, was highly illegal. Monitoring communications without warrant undermines the foundation of the basic concept of the US as a land that values liberty. It’s against all this society should stand for. The fact that it was approved and operated by the US government with such high approval makes it one of the most egregious crimes ever committed in the history of the US.

    Only the Tuskegee Experiment comes to mind when considering crimes by the US government that had to be revealed in order to stop them.

    In fact, I consider this matter so severe that it’s worth giving up all government secrets for. Yes, security demands that the US keep certain things secret, BUT if throwing the doors open on all secret intelligence is the only way to root this evil out completely, then so be it.

    The fact that the US was spying on other allied nations is also disgusting. I’m sure they had a clue to it before it went public, but it’s revolting and destroys all sense of international trust. it’s one thing to spy on North Korea or even China or Russia, but you don’t spy on the diplomatic communications of your closest allies and fellow NATO states. That destroys all sense of international trust and cooperation.

    I think what is needed here is criminal prosecutions, but NOT of Snowden. We should use the basic protocols applied to other major government crimes: the lowest level workers don’t get prosecuted. Most of them lose their jobs, but they don’t get prosecuted. But the managers and the ones who commanded the operation should be subject to criminal prosecution for violation of the rights of fellow Americans.

    The highest ranking officials, including John Roberts, the head of the NSA, who spoke to congress and called for Snowden to “Face Justice” should himself be facing justice. I would like to see the highest ranking officials who were part of this operation, such as John Roberts, top ranking Justice Department officials and others at the FBI who were at the top levels face the ultimate punishment.

    These officials should be dispensed with by the standard method used for the crime of treason (In this case undermining the basis of the US constitution). First, a public tribunal followed shortly after by hanging on a purpose-built gallows and then cremation and disposal of ashes.

    No, I will not be 100% happy until all the top ranking officials who organized this are either dead or spending the rest of their natural lives in prison.

    I don’t know how much Obama knew or was involved. Obviously that needs to be determined. If he was as involved as it seems, he needs to be hanged too, but given the political and societal issues that come with hanging a head of state, I’d be happy if he just resigned in disgrace as Nixon did.

    Sadly, the US government is circling its troops and nobody in the federal government is outraged.


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  6. 6
    DV82XL Says:

    I suspect that most nations engage in this sort of activity and in both domestic and international areas, friends as well as foes. The U.S. is taking what I think is a very hypocritical drubbing in the foreign press over this, when in fact it was a person driven by essentially American values and a belief that his country stood for something better that put his future, if not his life, on the line to expose the truth.

    This has always been America’s greatest PR problem: because it is a culture that strives to be open it exposes its own warts in ways no other nation will and as a consequence appears to be far worse than it is in comparison. But I have a feeling that if the truth were known, most other nations would fare much worse, and I don’t mean just the obvious ones like the military torture states, and the communist slave pens.


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  7. 7
    Shafe Says:

            drbuzz0 said:


    The fact that it was approved and operated by the US government with such high approval makes it one of the most egregious crimes ever committed in the history of the US.

    In fact, I consider this matter so severe that it’s worth giving up all government secrets for.

    I would like to see the highest ranking officials who were part of this operation, such as John Roberts, top ranking Justice Department officials and others at the FBI who were at the top levels face the ultimate punishment.

    First, a public tribunal followed shortly after by hanging on a purpose-built gallows and then cremation and disposal of ashes.

    If [Obama] was as involved as it seems, he needs to be hanged too…

    I’m tired of your equivocation. Quit hemming and hawing, and take a stand.

    Seriously, though, it’s a treat when someone makes no bones about the importance of sticking to the basics of our national ethics. In this day, American constitutionalism is often treated as right-wing or fringe ideology, even as progressives are practically considered moderate-left.

    I haven’t gone so far as to endorse execution of any of the players, but I definitely think any talk of charges of treason for Snowden should be off the table. In the meantime, I hope he gets granted asylum, not by some America-hating government, but by one that accepts him in esteem of his principles.


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  8. 8
    BMS Says:

            DV82XL said:

    I suspect that most nations engage in this sort of activity and in both domestic and international areas, friends as well as foes.

    You better believe they do!

    For example, France has been known for not only engaging in espionage on allies, but engaging in industrial espionage on behalf of French-owned (i.e., French-government-owned) companies.


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  9. 9
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Shafe said:

    I haven’t gone so far as to endorse execution of any of the players, but I definitely think any talk of charges of treason for Snowden should be off the table.

    Okay, I should be a little more clear on that.

    Hold a tribunal (or possibly a civilian trial depending on how things play out) and charge them with the highest crimes possible. We would see if any capital offenses stick.

    In any case, people like John Roberts should not be walking around with impunity as if they did nothing wrong. They should be fearing for their life and freedom right now, because of the crimes they have committed.

            DV82XL said:

    I suspect that most nations engage in this sort of activity and in both domestic and international areas, friends as well as foes. The U.S. is taking what I think is a very hypocritical drubbing in the foreign press over this, when in fact it was a person driven by essentially American values and a belief that his country stood for something better that put his future, if not his life, on the line to expose the truth.

    This has always been America’s greatest PR problem: because it is a culture that strives to be open it exposes its own warts in ways no other nation will and as a consequence appears to be far worse than it is in comparison. But I have a feeling that if the truth were known, most other nations would fare much worse, and I don’t mean just the obvious ones like the military torture states, and the communist slave pens.

    That’s true, but the US will go on and on about how it supports freedom and all these lofty goals. If that’s what the US message is going to be it has to follow through.

    Spying on your own peoples communications without warrant is an absurd violation of basic liberties. The US government has claimed it needs no warrant to spy on any conversation transmitted outside the US. That’s amazing. I call the UK or email Canada and they claim the right to snoop on it? No. They also don’t have the right to pars my phone call records or location data. At least, not without warrant.

    As for spying on allies, I guess it depends on the circumstances, but there are some stories that have come out that I found exceptionally disturbing. At major summits, the US apparently bugged the rooms of foreign diplomats and set up fake internet cafes with the intent of monitoring email.

    This is just bad forum. The problem is, while this may have just been made public, I strongly suspect that the nations who were bugged were able to figure it out before we all knew – at least in the case of some of them.

    I have another problems with this. Basic rights like the right against unreasonable search and seizure at a location where you have an expectation of privacy (such as a hotel room) should not be just for your own citizens. It should be extended to friendly foreign visitors. It should be a universal principle.

            BMS said:

    You better believe they do!

    For example, France has been known for not only engaging in espionage on allies, but engaging in industrial espionage on behalf of French-owned (i.e., French-government-owned) companies.

    I don’t care. China probably does worse and North Korea does worse still.


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  10. 10
    Matte Says:

            BMS said:

    You better believe they do!

    For example, France has been known for not only engaging in espionage on allies, but engaging in industrial espionage on behalf of French-owned (i.e., French-government-owned) companies.

    France has done worse and actually assassinated political candidates in Africa in order to “defend” their interests. How do I know this? Lets just say I have some “colourful” acquaintances…

    I do also know that the Swedish military intelligence (yes, it is not a joke) perform PRISM-like sweeps of the domestic internet and phone traffic, information that is shared with the US and all EU states I am sure. They have been criticised for breaching Swedish computerised database laws, by the agency/ombudsman responsible for monitoring public data bases. Nothing happens for some reason…


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  11. 11
    BMS Says:

            drbuzz0 said:

    I don’t care. China probably does worse and North Korea does worse still.

    I have no doubt about China, but did you mean to say South Korea? After all, North Korean “companies” don’t really compete with Western companies in the same market. The North Koreans are almost certainly trying to steal secrets, but these are secrets for making a better bomb, not for building a better widget.


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  12. 12
    BMS Says:

            Matte said:

    France has done worse …

    And they’ve done better, like blowing up that Greenpeace ship. :-)


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  13. 13
    Anon Says:

            BMS said:

    And they’ve done better, like blowing up that Greenpeace ship. :-)

    That can make up for a lot.


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  14. 14
    DV82XL Says:

            Anon said:

    That can make up for a lot.

    LOL


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  15. 15
    Matte Says:

            BMS said:

    And they’ve done better, like blowing up that Greenpeace ship. :-)

    True enough, unfortunately Greenpeace gained more than they lost on that one… The French should have dressed up as angry fishermen and sunk the boat with axes or something.


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  16. 16
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