HAARP Being Retired

November 2nd, 2014
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In 1993, a facility was established in Alaska known as HAARP or High Frequency Auroral Research Program.  It is operated as a joint project by the US Air Force, US Navy, University of Alaska and DARPA.   HAARP was built by BAE Advanced Technologies on a site owned by the US Air Force.  Much of the administration is handled by the University of Alaska.  In it’s two decade history, the facility has cost tax payers roughly half a billion dollars in both construction cost and annual operating expenses.  This is not a huge sum of money for a military research program, given the number of years it is spread out over.

HAARP has a number of different scientific instruments and systems on site.  These include UHF and VHF radars, geomagnetic sensors and radio receivers.  However, the heart of HAARP is a very powerful HF transmitting system, connected to a phased array of upward-pointing high gain antennas.  It directs a beam of up to 3.6 megawatts of RF energy upward at the ionosphere.  The operating frequency is between 2.8 and 10 MHz.

HAARP is an ionospheric heater.  It uses this energy to excite the ionosphere over the site.  The heating and excitement of the ionosphere allows measurements to be taken of the general state of the ionosphere.  Some of the energy is reflected back to the ground and can be received and analyzed. Pumping the ionosphere with RF energy can also produce a temporary controlled plasma turbulence effect.   The overall effect, however, is relatively modest and highly localized.  The 3.6 megawatts of RF energy a facility like HAARP can produce is quite small compared to the effects of geomagnetic fluctuation and solar wind particles on the ionosphere.

haarpimage

HAARP is basically a research facility.  There are a number of types of research conducted at HAARP.  Much of it is public, although some of the activities are military related and classified.

 Some of the classified military-related research that is either being conducted at HAARP or which has been credibly speculated to be conducted at HAARP include:

  • General purpose ionospheric science
  • Measurements of ionospheric bending of radio waves in order to improve HF direction finding
  • The effects of ionospheric disturbances on GPS reliability
  • HF communications jamming and countermeasures to jamming
  • Next generation over the horizon radar
  • Improved understanding of how ionospheric events, such as solar storms or nuclear weapon detonations can impact communications
  • The use of ionospheric stimulation as a means of generating ultra low frequency radio waves, which are vital to submarine communication and typically require very large antennas to transmit

Most of the science that goes on at HAARP is public, but even the potentially classified activities are, by most accounts, pretty innocuous, as far as classified research goes.  After all, it’s really nothing more than a big radio transmitter.  There’s nothing on site that has any real potential to be used as an offensive weapon.

That has not stopped conspiracy theorists.  HAARP is one of their favorite facilities.  It’s been linked to every other bogus claim from chemtrails to mind control.  It’s been said that HAARP can control the world’s weather, that it is responsible for earthquakes or major weather events.  Others have claimed that it is the cause of everything from chronic fatigue syndrome to the downing of aircraft and the 2003 loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

 

Conspiracy theorists can’t seem to agree on what kind of evil goes on at HAARP, or if it does everything that it has been blamed for.  Regardless the theories have managed to get quite a bit of attention.  Both the European Parliament and the Alaska state legislature held hearings about HAARP. The Russian government has also investigated the facility. However, none of these official inquiries seemed to find anything worrisome, although a Russian military journal speculated that ionospheric tests could “trigger a cascade of electrons that could flip earth’s magnetic poles.”

Jesse Ventura visited HAARP for his show “Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura” a couple of years ago. He was outraged that he was not let into the facility or given a full briefing on all the evils going on at the site. He probably would have been able to get in, however, if he didn’t just randomly show up one day and demand entry at the gate. Most of what HAARP does and the existence of the facility are not secret, after all.

In what is sure to be a major twist to conspiracy theorists, it has been announced that HAARP will be permanently shut down

Via Live Science:

Secret Weapon? Conspiracy Theories Abound as US Military Closes HAARP

The U.S. Air Force has notified Congress that it intends to shut down HAARP, a controversial Alaska-based research facility that studies an energetic and active region of the upper atmosphere.

Conspiracy theorists are abuzz about the news, given that HAARP (short for High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) has long been the center of wild speculation that the program is designed to control the weather — or worse. In 2010, Venezuelan leader Huge Chavez claimed that HAARP or a program like it triggered the Haiti earthquake.

For the record, the Haitian quake of 2010 was caused by the slippage of a previously unmapped fault along the border of the Caribbean and North American tectonic plates.

HAARP is a research program designed to analyze the ionosphere, a portion of the upper atmosphere that stretches from about 53 miles (85 kilometers) above the surface of the Earth to 370 miles (600 km) up. The program has been funded by the Air Force, the Navy, the University of Alaska and DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency).

Most activities at the site were suspended last year as a result of a change in the operating contract. It now seems that those activities will not resume.

By most accounts, the facility is now shut down and dismantlement of some of the equipment occurred as early as this past summer. Final decommissioning of the site should be completed by the end of the year. Not all of those involved are happy, also according to Live Science, there are at least a few researchers who would like to see the unique capabilities of the facility preserved, even if its military role comes to an end.

The reason for the shutdown of HAARP appears to be a combination of tightening military budgets and the fact that the facility seems to have accomplished its mission for the military, having conducted the research that it was built for.


This entry was posted on Sunday, November 2nd, 2014 at 5:59 pm and is filed under Bad Science, Conspiracy Theories, Just LAME, Misc, Not Even Wrong. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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9 Responses to “HAARP Being Retired”

  1. 1
    DV82XL Says:

    And so it passes into history, but even closed and dismantled it will still be treated as a running threat by the conspiracy theorists, most of whom won’t have gotten the memo.


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  2. 2
    John ONeill Says:

    The paranoids claimed that HAARP was manipulating the weather. Maybe that’s what it should be tried on.
    http://www.economist.com/node/12052171
    ‘Alfred Wong, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, proposes that a system involving powerful lasers and finely tuned radio waves could encourage carbon dioxide to take the same route ( as oxygen does naturally ) . His calculations suggested that using lasers to ionise molecules of carbon dioxide, and radio waves to get them to spin at the correct rate, would cause those molecules to spiral away from Earth along the lines of magnetic force until they were lost for ever in space.’
    I’ve no idea how practical such a scheme might be. Something similar has been proposed to oxidise methane in the atmosphere, if it seemed likely that methane emissions from melting permafrost, or from shallow clathrates under the warming Arctic ocean, might trigger a runaway positive feedback effect. Since that seems a much more likely threat to humanity than the risk of a large asteroid strike, it would seem prudent to put some funding into feasibility studies, and the HAARP installation is in the right place and has some of the gear needed to do so.


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  3. 3
    John ONeill Says:

    Wong’s UCLA research facility in Alaska was shut down two years ago.
    http://www.newsminer.com/news/local_news/article_f6569a8e-7888-51a2-8caf-f65d0f1db842.html?mode=jqm
    A guy I went to school with ( in New Zealand ) was working in a similar station in Norway, but I don’t think they had the capabilities of HAARP.


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  4. 4
    drbuzz0 Says:

            John ONeill said:

    The paranoids claimed that HAARP was manipulating the weather. Maybe that’s what it should be tried on.
    http://www.economist.com/node/12052171
    ‘Alfred Wong, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, proposes that a system involving powerful lasers and finely tuned radio waves could encourage carbon dioxide to take the same route ( as oxygen does naturally ) . His calculations suggested that using lasers to ionise molecules of carbon dioxide, and radio waves to get them to spin at the correct rate, would cause those molecules to spiral away from Earth along the lines of magnetic force until they were lost for ever in space.’
    I’ve no idea how practical such a scheme might be. Something similar has been proposed to oxidise methane in the atmosphere, if it seemed likely that methane emissions from melting permafrost, or from shallow clathrates under the warming Arctic ocean, might trigger a runaway positive feedback effect. Since that seems a much more likely threat to humanity than the risk of a large asteroid strike, it would seem prudent to put some funding into feasibility studies, and the HAARP installation is in the right place and has some of the gear needed to do so.

    I am highly skeptical of that. It might be possible to make it happen, but you’d be talking about really tiny amounts of CO2 being lost. The idea that you could have a system large enough to actually have any global effect seems implausible to me.

    Lets keep this in perspective. Our largest lasers are a few megawatts. They produce a beam that is less than a meter in diameter.

    A single moderately large coal burning power plant can easily generate a quantity of CO2 that has a mass greater than a battleship in a single day.

    If you took all the CO2 produced in a year by a single large coal burner and squeezed it down to the point where it became a solid, you’d be left with a block of dry ice larger than the biggest buildings ever constructed.

    But that’s just one coal plant. We have thousands of them, plus other sources of CO2. And we’ve been burning large quantities of hydrocarbons for more than a century.


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  5. 5
    DV82XL Says:

    Talk of HAARP made me recall a bit of nonsense that erupted near me several years ago over a wind-shear detection array that was installed in a field in the area. This consisted of several dozen 50Mhz Yagis mounted pointing straight up, fenced in, and along with a featureless building in the middle. One of the local conspiracy types was convinced this was a “mimi HAARP” and started getting worked up about it. No one took him seriously and it blew over, but it shows that these idiot ideas can have impacts beyond the original target.


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  6. 6
    Sigivald Says:

            DV82XL said:

    And so it passes into history, but even closed and dismantled it will still be treated as a running threat by the conspiracy theorists, most of whom won’t have gotten the memo.

    “Obviously it’s still operating and controlling the weather, and the “closure” was just a coverup!”

    The great thing about being immune to evidence and logic is that you can just believe any ol’ thing…


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  7. 7
    John ONeill Says:

    Looks like Professor Wong does have some form -he pleaded guilty to defrauding darpa http://www.wired.com/2013/05/haarp-fraud/


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  8. 8
    Jack William Says:

    solar energy refers primarily to the use of solar radiation for practical ends. However, all renewable energies, other than geothermal and tidal, derive their energy from the sun.Thanks dude for your time and efforts involved in all this.We truly appreciate it. This was really nice post..


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  9. 9
    drbuzz0 Says:

    There are some of those now who say the closing is proof that it is a weapon. If it had been for pure research then why has not a research institute like the University of Alaska or the National Science Foundation stepped up to take it over? (probably because it’s expensive to run a facility like that and they don’t have unlimited funds)

    They say it is closing because it’s only use was as a weapon and now the military does not need it because they have better “Super Haarps” and “Mobile Haarp”

    One of the things being circulated as a new replacement for HAARP is the Sea Based X-Band Radar. It’s claimed it’s a “Tesla Mega Weapon.”

    It’s actually a seagoing platform with a big raydome on it that has an X-band phased array antenna. It’s intended to provide regional radar coverage for ballistic missile tracking. There’s some legitimate debate about whether the Sea Based X-band Radar system is actually a worthy expense. Like, is it really that much better than the radar on warships, would it be better achieved using ground-based deplorable radar etc etc.

    I can tel you though, based on all the reliable info I have seen that the Sea-Based X-Band Radar is, in fact, a radar system. There’s no way it could control the weather or cause earthquakes.


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