As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her Untreated Cancer

February 27th, 2015
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Jessicadead

 

I take no pleasure in saying this.  However, it has come to my attention that Jessica Ainscough, the woman who I predicted would die of untreated cancer has passed away.

She was 30 years.  She spent seven of those years with a slowly progressing cancer that would ultimately kill her.

It was 2012 when I predicted this outcome, noting that the slow moving cancer would likely take a few more years to kill her.  It took about three.   To be perfectly honest, that’s roughly what I had expected, based on what doctors had told me and some research on the progression of the condition.

It is surely a sad day for her friends and family.  It’s terrible to lose a life at such an age, especially when it could have been prevented.  However, I believe this needs to be publicized and used as an example of how deadly cancer quackery can be.  She spent much of her life encouraging others to go down the path of fake treatments and quackery.  The ultimate result should be proof to any others who face the difficult decision of how to treat their cancer.

More info can be found here.


This entry was posted on Friday, February 27th, 2015 at 1:03 pm and is filed under Announcements, Bad Science, Quackery. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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93 Responses to “As Predicted, Jessica Ainscough Has Died Of Her Untreated Cancer”

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  1. 51
    Peg Says:

            DV82XL said:

    How dare you? No one here is happy she is dead.

    We do know what killed her. Stupidity.

    Idiots like you can try and spin this and twist and prevaricate, but if this person had listened to real doctors she would be alive today. Yes she would have been missing an arm, but she would have been alive. Her mom might have lived too if she hadn’t been talked into this nonsense, and if you read between the lines, Ainscough was feeling guilty about that too.

    This is a tragedy and a farce but if it is to have any meaning, demonstrating that ‘alternate’ medicine is a crock. Any other interpretation is trivializing her death.

    RESPONSE to Comment: “Her mom might have lived too if she hadn’t been talked into this nonsense”
    So you know for a FACT it was Jessica who talked her mom into following her way of life.
    TRUTH: It was Jessica’s mom who was the believer long before Jessica got sick. Jessica became the believer not her mother.
    So there was no GUILT between the lines to read. Just a broken heart from a young women who’s mother was the world to her.


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  2. 52
    IIMPP Says:

    Yep. She is dead. We lost a lovely and vibrant person who taught us how to thrive with cancer and how to live positive. It worked for her ffor many years but we all die sometimes and she died happy and with dignity and respect.

    ddon’t let that change anything for you. Continue to celebrate her death the way you do. Big victory for you guess. I hope someone you love gets cancer and dies so you will know how it feels.


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  3. 53
    Ceejay Says:

    Seriously!!! IMPP…..no one feels that way. No one is happy that she is gone. We all know that it is tragic for anyone to die, especially cancer. The problem we have is that she knew her cancer was coming back and did not inform anyone. She knew the Gerson didn’t work as she saw it in her mother and herself, and she still advocated for them, leading other desperate sufferers down the same path that she took which was not working. I do beleive her initial intentions were good, but when people specifically asked her about the arm she would never confess and give excuses. It got harder and harder to hide the arm. On her site a user asked this below:

    December 16, 2014 at 1:42 pm
    hi jess. i’ve followed you for several years and i’ve wondered if your cancer would get worse – based on what i saw you doing with your diet in particular. i’m gonna be honest with you with my only intention being to help you. everybody is entitled to their opinion based on their experience. i’ve always wondered if you read gerson’s original book (minus what charlotte added to the book). i honestly believe that if you cut back out all animal products, all added oils and fats (including flaxseed oil which i personally consider to be one of the most toxic of all oils) and most of the vitamin supplements you are taking except the B12 injections and iodine which i apply only to my skin because of it’s voltility (most vitamin supplements are toxic to the sick body as gerson said in his original book – and it’s something i have found in my own illness and it’s also discussed in the book called WHOLE – by Colin T Campbell), then i think you’d find that your heath would improve again. the flaxseed oil and most of the vitamin supplements are kicking your liver and bloodstream while they’re down. it’s not just the active ingredient in synthetic vitamin supplements that’s the problem, it’s all the fillers and other crap that was made in some factory probably in china with the cheapest ingredients they could source. many, many overt fat free or low fat, high fruit (and veggie) vegans have recovered from aggressive cancers – brain cancer etc etc etc. – without the use of synthetic vitamin supplementation and added oils. admiring the likes of david wolfe and reading about all the other stuff you had in your diet told me you were off the mark a tad. also, even thinking that a higher protein and fat diet could help you with your health (when you did that experiment) also told me that somehow you’d lost your way with what is scientifically proven as a diet for health recovery (i refer to caldwell esselstyn and colin T campbell’s work). i recommend you look up megan elizabeth, fullyraw kristina, raw synergy tv and even freelee the banana girl on youtube to see how these women look amazing and have overcome health issues and have needed minimal vitamin supplementation and virtually no oils to achieve that goal. anyways, good luck with your journey. leesa

    Does that sound like someone who is trying to harm. Actually it sounds like someone who is trying to help. I hope people aren’t brainwashed by Gerson and understand that it is a faulty program without facts and real data. I too was once a beleiver, but its clear that it doesn’t work as they CLAIM it does. No one blames Jessica for following the Gerson. I fault her for knowing the truth later and not being honest with her users….she omitted and still led those same people to beleive that it worked when in essence, it doesn’t.


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  4. 54
    Shafe Says:

            Ceejay said:


    i honestly believe that if you cut back out all animal products, all added oils and fats (including flaxseed oil which i personally consider to be one of the most toxic of all oils) and most of the vitamin supplements you are taking except the B12 injections and iodine which i apply only to my skin because of it’s voltility (most vitamin supplements are toxic to the sick body as gerson said in his original book – and it’s something i have found in my own illness and it’s also discussed in the book called WHOLE – by Colin T Campbell), then i think you’d find that your heath would improve again.

    Does that sound like someone who is trying to harm. Actually it sounds like someone who is trying to help.

    That sounds like someone who is even more whacked out than run-of-the-mill Gerson quacks and is blaming Ainscough’s inability to cure her cancer on being insufficiently austere. The gist is, “Gerson works… if you do it right… which you didn’t… so you’re dying.”


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  5. 55
    EndTheHateNow Says:

    She is dead. Her mother is dead.

    You hated her for her not paying into the massive pharma profits and for going with a natural and healthy life. She cost you money and you hate that. She told people that they had other options and you hate that.

    Now the person you hate is dead.

    Will that stop your hatred? It probably won’t. You can celebrate her death even as you keep hating her.

    Hate is toxic and will kill you, but you don’t care. Maybe we’ll celebrate when you die.


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  6. 56
    DV82XL Says:

    The only posters that evidenced any hatred through this whole sad affair have been those that will not accept the fact that this person died and did not have to. No one here is celebrating her death and making the claim that we are is mendacious to the extreme. Nor did we ‘win.’ Winning would have been that she saw the light soon enough to save her own life. This is a loss for us because reason did not prevail over lies, and we are sad and angry.


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  7. 57
    EndTheHateNow Says:

    The only reason you are angry is she didn’t spend her last years paying money to bit pharmaceutical and hospital companies. She spent her last years thriving and happy and not paying her life savings to the industries that you are paid from.

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.


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  8. 58
    drbuzz0 Says:

            EndTheHateNow said:

    The only reason you are angry is she didn’t spend her last years paying money to bit pharmaceutical and hospital companies. She spent her last years thriving and happy and not paying her life savings to the industries that you are paid from.

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.

    First, I do not make any money off of cancer therapy. I am not employed by the big pharmaceutical companies. I don’t have any direct investments in them (I might have some small ones through mutual funds)

    I think you might want to rethink your definition of “thrive”

    When this first started, a few years ago, she didn’t have any serious symtoms. She continued to live without any major pain or suffering for a couple of years. That’s what you’d expect. That’s not because of her nutrition. That’s the natural course of the disease.

    In her blog she rarely spoke about her exact symptoms, but she eluded to them and people had seen her in presentations and such.

    It seems that about three or four years ago, she lost most use of her arm. She had her hand in a constant position and wore a brace on it. A couple of years ago she wrote about how her arm had gotten swollen and was not receding. That sounds very unpleasant.

    She stopped blogging and making public appearances back in June. She wrote about how she had constant pain, was bedridden, was bleeding constantly from her armpit. It does not sound like it was very good. Sadly, that is how you expect the disease to progress. It likely got worse as it started to take over her torso.

    She was diagnosed with cancer 7 years ago. She had surgery and chemo and that bought her some time. About a year later, it came back. Then she went about five and a half years without treatment.

    She spent those years obsessing over her diet and giving herself enemas. Sounds… like it wasn’t so much fun. I mean, unless you just love enemas and stuff.

    Of those, the first two were probably not so bad. However, things got worse from there and reading about her condition toward the end really makes me feel very sad for anyone to go through that.

    She did apparently go back to an oncologist, in the end. I wish she had been more public about it, but she mentioned it. Hopefully they were able to help her with palative care and some industrial strength pain killers.

    One of the memorial pages says “She died drug free.” God, I hope that’s not the case. That would be merciless. I hope she actually had plenty of muscle relaxants, pain killers and that kind of thing at the end.


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  9. 59
    DV82XL Says:

            EndTheHateNow said:

    Karma is a bitch. What goes around comes around. I am not hateful and I do not want to wish cancer on you, but as I said, karma is a bitch and you just might put yourself in that place.

    You know the only reason these posters are spitting mad is that everything they believed in is exposed as a fraud by Ainscough’s death. They care nothing for the girl herself beyond the fact that she was the poster-child for their make-believe view of the world, and she let them down. They can’t bring themselves to blame her, so the lash out at the messenger. How typical of the deluded; how sad.

    As for karma, if you knew anything about what that concept meant, or truly believed in it, you wouldn’t be concerned about our balance sheet in that regard, but rather your own.


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  10. 60
    Rose Says:

    Please don’t let it be so that she went without drugs. When my grandma and grandpa died of cancer, we made damn sure that they went out on a nice and comfortable opiate high. I am extremely disturbed right now if this was the case.

    Jessica’s sycophants remind me of telling a small child that Santa isn’t real. Gerson therapy does not work at all and people with terminal cancer who leave it untreated die of terminal cancer. What truly surprises me is how many of them seemed surprised by her death, when it has been obvious to me that she has been very sick for quite some time.

    Oh, and since I know this is bound to come up, I want to clear something up about Gerson. Here I go; I am about to throw you Gersonites a really, big, juicy, non-vegan bone. If I were to accept that Gerson therapy works the way that you people claim it works, then I must also accept that it must be followed to the T, without any deviation whatsoever for two years straight, day in and day out. Everyone always says that the reason is does not work very well is due to user error. Well, okay then, even if all that is true then all that means is THAT IT DOES NOT FREAKING WORK. If it is impossible for a human being to follow with total compliance THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If just small deviations makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If one missed enema makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK. If one non-organic orange makes it ineffective THEN IT DOES NOT WORK.

    If a human being in their imperfect form cannot follow the protocol (and apparently none can), then it does not work. It does not matter if it works in theory, if it cannot be carried out in practice THEN IT DOES NOT WORK.


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  11. 61
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    You know the only reason these posters are spitting mad is that everything they believed in is exposed as a fraud by Ainscough’s death. They care nothing for the girl herself beyond the fact that she was the poster-child for their make-believe view of the world, and she let them down. They can’t bring themselves to blame her, so the lash out at the messenger. How typical of the deluded; how sad.

    As for karma, if you knew anything about what that concept meant, or truly believed in it, you wouldn’t be concerned about our balance sheet in that regard, but rather your own.

    Only uneducated, immature narcissists talk about karma. It is the (asinine) go-to “argument” for a person who has felt slighted when they have no cause to be. If any of Jessica’s disciples want to lay out a clear and logical argument in defense of what happened to Jessica, then I am waiting with bated breath over here. So far, all I have seen is calling us meanies and telling us that karma will get us.

    Actually go right ahead and let karma come for me. All I have ever said about this woman and Gerson will only ultimately lead to good. My conscience is clear.


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  12. 62
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Only uneducated, immature narcissists talk about karma. It is the (asinine) go-to “argument” for a person who has felt slighted when they have no cause to be.

    I tend to agree but when I wrote if they knew anything about it, I meant Karma as the fundamental doctrine in Buddhism wherein it is the law of moral causation. If they really were to believe in it as an element of faith, they, not us bear the price for actions leading to Ainscough’s death.

    Now I am a rabid atheist, and no more believe in Karma then I believe in Grace (the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings) but it is still ironic that the poster should claim we have a lien on our souls over this and they don’t.


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  13. 63
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    I tend to agree but when I wrote if they knew anything about it, I meant Karma as the fundamental doctrine in Buddhism wherein it is the law of moral causation. If they really were to believe in it as an element of faith, they, not us bear the price for actions leading to Ainscough’s death.

    Now I am a rabid atheist, and no more believe in Karma then I believe in Grace (the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings) but it is still ironic that the poster should claim we have a lien on our souls over this and they don’t.

    I assure you that you know more about karma then anyone who actually believes in it. Most of them could not even come up with which religion originated the concept. But, hey, Karma! You big meanie!

    We have done nothing wrong and everything we have stood for here on this blog over the years will only lead to good. I am VERY PROUD of everyone who came here and spoke out against quackery. I have nothing but respect for Depleted Cranium and Pip Cornwall especially. These two people have put in their own time and effort to combat the Gerson scam. Pip Cornwall especially posts all over the internet and he takes a lot of abuse and he is still relentless in spreading the word of people getting (and deserving) proper medical care. Pip, I think you deserve a lot of respect and you have ALL my respect. The people fooled by quackery insult you when I know that it is you who truly helps people with cancer, and not the charlatans who lie and scam people when they are at their most vulnerable.


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  14. 64
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Rose said:

    Please don’t let it be so that she went without drugs. When my grandma and grandpa died of cancer, we made damn sure that they went out on a nice and comfortable opiate high. I am extremely disturbed right now if this was the case.

    One of the sites that memorialized her said she died “drug free.” I don’t know if they just mean cancer drugs or what. But for the sake of basic humanity and mercy do really hope she had some pain killers at the end.

    Some more good information and analysis can be found here:

    http://www.mamamia.com.au/wellbeing/jess-ainscough-died-of-cancer-this-week/

    This is written by Dr. David Gorski. I know Dr. Gorski and he’s a very competent cancer doctor with a great deal of experience the issues of “alternative” cancer treatment. (Obviously he’s been called a shill for the big pharmaceutical companies more than a few times.)

    He was one of the doctors I talked to when I wrote the first article and asked him about the potential course of the illness.

    He has an interesting take on what killed her. We know it was almost certainly cancer. Dr. Gorski seems to think it probably was an instance of the cancer getting so bad that it erupted from the skin and caused constant blood loss and that this could have also lead to sepsis.

    That’s one way it could have killed her. Another is that it spread beyond her arm and caused respiratory or circulatory problems. Actually, there are many ways that it ultimately could have killed her. Unfortunately, they are all very unpleasant. This is not like dying of a heart attack in your sleep, unfortunately.


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  15. 65
    drbuzz0 Says:

    http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-gerson-protocol-and-the-death-of-jess-ainscough/


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  16. 66
    Jennifer Says:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry. U want money. U got it. But u are not going fool nobody.

    She lived because she made the right choice. She lived seven years. I kno ppl who have one on chemo and died in a year and that should tell you something. She died because she strated chemo like the doctors had told her to. Chemo=death. Cancer has never killed anyone. It’s not a disease. It is a sign of ur body needs more nutrients. Ppl die from lack of nutrients + from chemo which is POISON.

    Follow your own advice and you will end up with cancer. I hope you do.

    Some1 already said Karma. Just wait. When u do get cancer we’ll laugh at you when chemo kills you too.

    Jsesica is in heaven. But U will burn in hell.


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  17. 67
    Greg Says:

    Hi. I am a med school student studying, and I realize med school students often seem to think they know it all before we’ve actually completed training.

    I have to say, though, reading the first post about her it was painfully spot on.

    This was a really simple situation. If nothing was done to stop the cancer it would do what cancer does and it would grow and grow and stop when it killed her. It seems to me like it is not a concept that is too complex for the average person to understand. cancer does not (or at least very rarely) just stops on its own. Organic juice and coffee enemas are never going to stop a growing tumor. You have limited options to stop it before it kills.

    Reading it is heartbreaking because it was so obvious to everyone but her. Part of me feels like if there had just been the right person to talk some sense into her she might be alive. They would not have suggested amputating her arm if they didn’t have good reason to believe it would have saved her life.

    It makes me wonder were there anyone around her who could see through this? Didn’t she have any family or friends who could sit her down and tell her she was going to die if she continued?


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  18. 68
    LouV Says:

            Jennifer said:

    She lived because she made the right choice. She lived seven years. I kno ppl who have one on chemo and died in a year and that should tell you something.

    Except that she didn’t simply have “cancer”. She had a specific cancer with slow progression & detected early, while some other types of cancer progress faster or are diagnosed too late. So your examples are not helpful.
    This is why we talk about this sad case. People advertised her situation as evidence that Gerson could work for a lot of people. We, on the other hand, are discussing her not to say that her death invalidates Gerson (that’s what clinical trials already did), but to say that publicized success stories are not good evidence.

    As for the other parts of your comment… I don’t even know where to begin.
    Just learn what a clinical trial is and why we need them. Then look for the ones who have been done for Gerson


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  19. 69
    DV82XL Says:

            Jennifer said:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry.

    You’re right it is about money no one on this site collects any for what we write. But the fact is that everything you can say about real medicine making money from those with cancer, applies equally to those that sell alternate treatments. So even if we were to make the unwarranted presumption these latter were effective, those offering them are just as much in business to sell product as the former.


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  20. 70
    Dave G Says:

    sad, but yes, predictable. It does not take a genius to grasp the concept that if you have cancer and do nothing about it that it will probably kill you. I know there is spontaneous remission, but that is super rare for any cancer that has gotten very far.

    I do not understand how people can believe this bs. The main part of this treatment regime, besides a lot of fruit juisce is putting coffee in your butt multiple times a day. seriously, who thinks that they have cancer in their arm and putting coffee in their anus is going to cure that?

    It’s not even “natural” either. In what natural, pre-industrial setting did humans brew up coffee and then stick a tube in their anus and pour the coffee in. That’s not something your body is designed to require. It’s nuts, quite frankly. how does anyone not see through that?


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  21. 71
    Karen Says:

    sadly, she was never thriving. her arm looked like hell two or three years ago and her hand was not of much use i think she could not fully articulate her fingers. On the bright side for her it was her left arm and she was right handed. It’s sad that the benefit of not doing what doctors told her was she got to keep an arm that ended up being of not much use and painful.

    People did try to convince her otherwise. She said that the Gerson therapy and the organic diet and detox regime were working and she actually would cite her worsening condition to prove it. she would say that the cancer was being drawn out or that it was a sign of her body releasing toxins. She also blamed some of the pain and swelling on her early surgery and chemo. There may have been some truth to that, because they did need to take out lymphnodes, but it can’t account for the fact that her arm clearly got worse and worse until last year when it was so bad she couldn’t just wear long shirts and turn it away from the camera anymore.

    She also said that she would ‘do what works” and that she would go back to doctors if what she was doing didn’t work. She thought it worked. It was too late when it became impossible to ignore.

    She was surrounded by people she thought were being positive by constantly patting her on the back and praising her for doing the right thing. A lot of seemingly positive supportive people who were yes men and yes women who made suer she was told it was going great. I think she liked the attention.

    I used to work for a publicist who worked on some of her engagements and promo things. I met her at events a couple of times. People gushed over what a great thing she was doing. some of them fans and some her people.

    Money was made for sure. I don’t mean her treatments, but I am sure they did too. Her website and market affiliation and her magazine articles and speaking engagements and the events she was at. There were many fingers in the pot and plenty of books and mags and things being sold.

    I am sure she made good money too even after everyone took their cut. It is stupid to talk about her making money as if she was just in it for money because I do think she believed it. You can’t take your money to the grave, so there is no point.


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  22. 72
    Matthew Says:

            Jennifer said:

    All these sites are just about money. Cancer is a 40 billion dollar industry. U want money. U got it. But u are not going fool nobody.

    Cancer is also a money loser for the pharma industry. If it was to simply disappear tomorrow, their profits would go through the roof. The ideal pharma patient is someone who is basically healthy, picking up minor chronic issues (arthritis, angina, COPD, heart disease, etc) as they get older. 20 years of heart pressure and arthritis meds represent *way* more money than a course of chemo.


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  23. 73
    Rose Says:

    Most of us who are fortunate enough to live in a first world country will likely die of cancer or heart disease. Both are conditions that people are more likely to get as they get older and both are difficult to treat, not because they actually know the cure and suppressing it. Fortunately we have made a lot of progress and so many cancers are now survivable. If you live in Australia or the United States, and most of the people you have known who died, died of cancer, then that speaks volumes about how fantastic our medical care is. Most people in these two countries can expect to live long enough to eventually die from cancer. It was horrifying for us to see someone die at the age of 30, but that used to happen all the time, before we made progress in treating disease. So many people who come here and bash conventional medicine are alive today because of it. You’re spoiled and lower-end thinkers so you take it for granted that you survived childbirth, or that you got those antibiotics as a child, but that is all the just result of science and conventional medicine.


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  24. 74
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    You’re spoiled and lower-end thinkers …

    Christopher Booker described wishful thinking in terms of he called “the fantasy cycle”:

    ” When we embark on a course of action which is unconsciously driven by wishful thinking, all may seem to go well for a time, in what may be called the ‘dream stage’. But because this make-believe can never be reconciled with reality, it leads to a ‘frustration stage’ as things start to go wrong, prompting a more determined effort to keep the fantasy in being. As reality presses in, it leads to a ‘nightmare stage’ as everything goes wrong, culminating in an ‘explosion into reality’, when the fantasy finally falls apart”.

    This is exactly what occurred here, and why Ainscough’s disciples are in such a state of rage. There is no reasoning with them at this point, and really no need – reality is rubbing their faces in their error, and there is not a damned thing they can do about it. They can twist and prevaricate all they want. They can fling petulant accusations and rail at us all they want questioning our motives, but in the end they know that they are wrong and everything that follows is just a pathetic attempt to salve their wounded egos.


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  25. 75
    Rose Says:

            Greg said:

    Hi. I am a med school student studying, and I realize med school students often seem to think they know it all before we’ve actually completed training.

    I have to say, though, reading the first post about her it was painfully spot on.

    This was a really simple situation. If nothing was done to stop the cancer it would do what cancer does and it would grow and grow and stop when it killed her. It seems to me like it is not a concept that is too complex for the average person to understand. cancer does not (or at least very rarely) just stops on its own. Organic juice and coffee enemas are never going to stop a growing tumor. You have limited options to stop it before it kills.

    Reading it is heartbreaking because it was so obvious to everyone but her. Part of me feels like if there had just been the right person to talk some sense into her she might be alive. They would not have suggested amputating her arm if they didn’t have good reason to believe it would have saved her life.

    It makes me wonder were there anyone around her who could see through this? Didn’t she have any family or friends who could sit her down and tell her she was going to die if she continued?

    Well, her mother was deep into woo long before Jessica got cancer. That right there likely sealed her fate. When you are 22 years old, it is often your mother who is the voice of reason and wisdom in your life. The fact that Sharyn Ainscough was a “magical thinker” is something that I think really, truly had a profound effect on Jessica. Her mother quit her job just so she could help Jessica get through Gerson. Her father grew organic vegetables for her. Obviously, their hearts were in the right place, but they were her number one enablers and I do not think she had much hope to ever get real medical care because of this.

    Also, Jessica eventually had thousands and thousands of people cheering her on. If Jessica ever had any doubts, there was ALWAYS someone there to quash them. Her original oncologists were the only people in her life who told her the truth and who offered her real hope of a normal lifespan, and she rejected them. There were people like me, Rosalie, Orac, and DC, who sent her messages and letters imploring her to get proper medical care, but she never responded. I wrote on her facebook page, telling her that no one would judge her if she went conventional, and though one person there supported me, the rest shouted me down and thread was deleted.

    I fee like I have been watching a train wreck in slow motion for the past few years.


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  26. 76
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    Christopher Booker described wishful thinking in terms of he called “the fantasy cycle”:

    ” When we embark on a course of action which is unconsciously driven by wishful thinking, all may seem to go well for a time, in what may be called the ‘dream stage’. But because this make-believe can never be reconciled with reality, it leads to a ‘frustration stage’ as things start to go wrong, prompting a more determined effort to keep the fantasy in being. As reality presses in, it leads to a ‘nightmare stage’ as everything goes wrong, culminating in an ‘explosion into reality’, when the fantasy finally falls apart”.

    This is exactly what occurred here, and why Ainscough’s disciples are in such a state of rage. There is no reasoning with them at this point, and really no need – reality is rubbing their faces in their error, and there is not a damned thing they can do about it. They can twist and prevaricate all they want. They can fling petulant accusations and rail at us all they want questioning our motives, but in the end they know that they are wrong and everything that follows is just a pathetic attempt to salve their wounded egos.

    You nailed it. That is exactly what is going on here. Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die. How many here have told us that we are going to hell? Or that karma will get us? They all seemed so sure that Jessica would survive and that they were going to prove us wrong. I mean, that makes no sense to me. The woman had terminal cancer.

    I had never heard the term “fantasy cycle” before but now that I see it in black and white, I can think of at least one person I know who lives her entire life like this. Knowing her I can rather confidently say that we are wasting our energy trying to explain to Jessica’s sycophants the reality and truth of what happened here. They would have to give up the way they live their entire lives in order to process it and that would simply be too painful.


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  27. 77
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die.

    For the record, I am not the blog owner, nor did I post the lead article, that would be Steve Packard (drbuzz0.) My name is Robert Gauthier, and I post comments here as DV82XL.


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  28. 78
    Rose Says:

            DV82XL said:

    For the record, I am not the blog owner, nor did I post the lead article, that would be Steve Packard (drbuzz0.) My name is Robert Gauthier, and I post comments here as DV82XL.

    Sorry I mix you two up. Well either way, I have been accused of being evil and uncaring because I said that Jessica was going to die. Thinking of them as the kind of people who live life according to fantasy cycles though, this is all starting to make sense to me. Now obviously no one can cause another person to die just by saying that they are going to die, but so many of Jessica’s supporters have written posts here that leads me to believe that they truly believe that. I think what is really going on is that by pointing out the truth, we are briefly taking them out of their fantasy cycle, something which is deeply distressful to them. Several of them seemed legitimately taken off guard by Jessica’s death, even though she has been on an obvious decline for many months now. They have decided to lash out at us because we were the first ones to briefly remove them from the world of fantasy and back into the world of reality. Earlier I said it was like telling a small child that Santa is not real. I think I was describing the fantasy cycle without realizing it.


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  29. 79
    DV82XL Says:

            Rose said:

    Well either way, I have been accused of being evil and uncaring because I said that Jessica was going to die.

    It’s easy to demonize the cranky Cassandras and make them the problem, because they make people uncomfortable. But if the consequences of bad ideas are not held up to the placid mob, and if everyone is being Mr and Mrs Nice and reassuring fools that they’re still good people no matter what rubbish they might believe in, where is the motivation to change?


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  30. 80
    Ceejay Says:

    The more and more I read about Jessica the sadder I get. There was an article on:

    http://www.maketheworldmove.com/stop-wishing-for-things-to-be-different-by-jessica-ainscough-make-the-world-move/

    Her exact comments were:

    “As a result of the chemo I had on my arm four years ago, my left hand and arm is pretty damaged. I have next to no strength in it and my left middle finger is fused at the knuckle and curled over into my palm. Hence why I don’t like flat-handed yoga postures. I simply can’t do them, and it leaves me feeling incredibly frustrated.

    On top of that, each year around this time I usually find myself wishing for things to be different. I wish that I could swim in the ocean (a no-no for Gerson Therapy people). While I don’t like to admit it, seeing as I preach the wellness word so strongly, I also wish that I could celebrate the holidays and new year with a few drinks. I wish that I could eat, drink and be festively merry with all of my friends. But I can’t. My desire to be loyal to the healthiest, best version of me is far stronger than my desire to get hammered.

    I’m still going to continue visualising my arm strong and pain-free, but I’m going to stop cursing at it every time it holds me back from doing things I think I should be able to do. If nothing else, the restrictions my arm imposes keep me humble, the pain keeps me present, and the scars are signs of the strength my body has shown over the past few years. The fact that my arm is still attached to my body – despite doctors telling me it had to be chopped off – is a constant reminder of my resilience.”

    Her commitment to the Gerson protocol 4 years later sounds so cultish and restrictive. Its such a sad way to live. I hate that someone so young put herself through so much and convinced herself that if she deviated anyway or anyhow that she would have failed. When ultimately Gerson failed her completely.

    Its a sad and tragic way to live and the Gerson folks should be truly ashamed. I really hope they stop with the scamming. I understand Jessica chose her own path, but to be made to feel guilty for living is crazy. Those folks should be shut down completely!

    Its sad and frustrating.


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  31. 81
    drbuzz0 Says:

            Rose said:

    You nailed it. That is exactly what is going on here. Some seriously seem to think that it was your blog post that CAUSED Jessica to die. How many here have told us that we are going to hell? Or that karma will get us? They all seemed so sure that Jessica would survive and that they were going to prove us wrong. I mean, that makes no sense to me. The woman had terminal cancer.

    Yes. It is my blog and a few people have asked if I am no longer blogging or why I am not commenting as much. I just happen to have about three major things going on in life right now plus some other things that have occupied me the past month and will continue to until around April. (Big work project among other things)

    I cannot stress enough that I did not want this woman to die nor did I wish to come out as smug or preachy when I said she would die. I said it so bluntly to both counter the ridiculous claims she was being healed and even to try to maybe get her attention.

    I have taken no joy in seeing her condition deteriorate nor seeing her mother die. When her mother died, I did briefly hope it would shock Jessica to reality and maybe there would be time to save her.

    This is not good, but I also think that we should not avoid the topic of her death. It needs to be publicized, because the failures of these therapies get way too little press. Occasionally someone survives with alternative therapy only, and when they do, it’s often a case of misdiagnosis to begin with or even spontaneous remission, but that gets lots of press.

    People turn away from real medicine to things like Gerson therapy and they did. They die all the time. It needs to be out there. When people turn to Google to try to research what therapy to use for their cancer, I want them to see the fact that there are people dying because they believed in this crap.


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  32. 82
    DV82XL Says:

    The Guardian weights in:

    Jess Ainscough’s tragic death is all too familiar for oncologists. We’ve all lost patients to the ‘secret powers’ of alternative therapy.

    Research shows that nearly 70% of cancer patients and a staggering 90% of patients enrolled in an early phase clinical trial use alternative therapies. We now know that many of these therapies are not only unhelpful but are downright dangerous. Herbs and supplements can interact with chemotherapy and reduce its efficacy, a real drawback when therapy is given with curative intent.”


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  33. 83
    K Says:

    I don’t think you’re a heartless person, but by posting this you do sound like one.

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    I’m myself am undergoing cancer treatment and I had to sign a form at the oncologist’s office that “I understand that Surgery, Medication and other forms of treatment are not an exact science”! The jury’s still out on this one. The fact remains that there’s no clear understanding of many types of cancer nor there are any scientifically proven treatment; if there was then everyone would be taking that route. Presently the cause of cancer is unknown, and it’s a statistical outlier with no clear way to treat it. That’s why many resort to alternative therapies in addition to or in place of conventional treatment. Mine’s stage 4 with doctors giving me zero hope. If alternative therapies at least offer me some mental solace, what’s wrong with it?

    It’s well proven that a healthy emotional state improves immune system (look up “Mind over Medicine” by Lissa Rankin”). I agree that people should still seek out conventional treatment. But to completely ignore the merits of alternative therapies without conventional treatments being scientifically proven, seems very biased and illogical. Truth’s not always black or white, it’s often a shade of gray. There’s place for both conventional as well as alternative treatments.

    May her soul rest in peace. Let’s not use her death to promote any agenda. The fact remains that as of date, almost all treatments for cancer (including surgery and mainstream medicine) are scientifically unproven, and people should use combination of all treatments to help themselves heal. Peace.


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  34. 84
    Bryan Says:

    She did die, as you, the author predicted, but she took 7 years from first diagnosis and 3 years from your prediction to die. Does this surprise you? Did she take more or less time than you expected?


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  35. 85
    Rose Says:

            K said:

    I don’t think you’re a heartless person, but by posting this you do sound like one.

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    I’m myself am undergoing cancer treatment and I had to sign a form at the oncologist’s office that “I understand that Surgery, Medication and other forms of treatment are not an exact science”! The jury’s still out on this one. The fact remains that there’s no clear understanding of many types of cancer nor there are any scientifically proven treatment; if there was then everyone would be taking that route. Presently the cause of cancer is unknown, and it’s a statistical outlier with no clear way to treat it. That’s why many resort to alternative therapies in addition to or in place of conventional treatment. Mine’s stage 4 with doctors giving me zero hope. If alternative therapies at least offer me some mental solace, what’s wrong with it?

    It’s well proven that a healthy emotional state improves immune system (look up “Mind over Medicine” by Lissa Rankin”). I agree that people should still seek out conventional treatment. But to completely ignore the merits of alternative therapies without conventional treatments being scientifically proven, seems very biased and illogical. Truth’s not always black or white, it’s often a shade of gray. There’s place for both conventional as well as alternative treatments.

    May her soul rest in peace. Let’s not use her death to promote any agenda. The fact remains that as of date, almost all treatments for cancer (including surgery and mainstream medicine) are scientifically unproven, and people should use combination of all treatments to help themselves heal. Peace.

    The sign on your oncologist’s door is the exact point we have been trying to make here. I do not understand what is SO incredibly complicated about this. No one has The Cure for cancer. There are no shades of gray here. Your oncologist offers you scientifically studied, evidence-based medicine. That does not mean that it will cure you, and your oncologist never claims that it does. What that medicine does for people depends on a lot of factors. In some cases, it works great and puts the cancer into remission. Some people get cancer at 40 and will die at 90. It works that good. In some cases, there is not much conventional medicine can do. They have little in the way of treatment for your cancer, but what they can offer you is palliation, and it can make your final months and days so much more comfortable than no treatment at all.

    Again, since this appears to go over everyone’s head, let me repeat it: conventional medicine has never once claimed it has The Cure for cancer; all it claims to do is give the the best evidence-based treatment it can.

    Woo flingers are lying sacks of crap who tell you that they do have a cure for cancer. But according to people like you, because conventional medicine can not promise a good outcome, it is a respectable “alternative” to go to the lying sacks of crap for “treatment”. Seriously? So if conventional medicine is not perfect, then alternative medicine must therefore be a viable option? WTF? Really? The only reason people get any sort of “mental solace” from alternative medicine is because the person selling it to them is LYING. That “mental solace” soon becomes frustration, anger and guilt.

    Here is the sad reality of the times we live in: we do not have a clear-cut cure for cancer. That means that a lot of us are going to die of cancer. There is very often little that can be about it. However, giving money, time and emotional energy to quackery is not the solution. I actually agree that people suffering from cancer probably do need a lot more psychological and emotional support than they get. But for that they need a real psychologist or counselor, and not some charlatan promising them that they can cure their cancer.

    Back to Jessica for a second here. Jessica had a very difficult cancer to treat. She had a terminal illness with very limited treatment options. This happens sometimes. Sometimes conventional medicine has little to offer a patient. In Jessica’s case, the only option that had a reasonable chance of significantly extending her lifespan was the amputation. I cannot stress enough that this was Jessica’s ONLY treatment option available. Once she rejected it, she was guaranteed to die of epithelioid sarcoma. Again, once Jessica decided against the amputation, she was 100% going to die from her cancer within a few years (unless she got hit by a bus). There was no “alternative treatment”. The “alternative” to the amputation was a guaranteed death from cancer. Does that mean that conventional treatment is perfect? Heck no. Does it mean that the amputation would for sure have been successful? Absolutely not. The conventional treatment was simply Jessica’s one and only hope of living a reasonably long life. It was not perfect, and indeed it was not even all that good. It simply was the only choice available to Jessica that would have NOT guaranteed a death from cancer. People keep saying that Jessica’s treatment options sucked, and they are completely correct. Her treatment options DID suck, but they were ALL THAT SHE HAD.

    Alternative therapies are not alternatives; they are just living a life with untreated cancer.


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  36. 86
    Rose Says:

            Bryan said:

    She did die, as you, the author predicted, but she took 7 years from first diagnosis and 3 years from your prediction to die. Does this surprise you? Did she take more or less time than you expected?

    It would be an average life expectancy for this kind of cancer, and keep in mind that she bought herself another year or so with the chemotherapy she got. Epithelioid sarcoma is a very slow-growing, yet relentless cancer. People live with it for years.

    But perhaps the author of the blog can answer this better.


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  37. 87
    LouV Says:

            K said:

    Millions of people die from conventional cancer treatment within first or second year of their diagnosis. Does that mean conventional treatment is bogus? Jessica thrived 7 years on her cancer. Her death alone doesn’t mean that alternative treatments don’t work. There are many who get well from Alternative treatments as well as conventional treatment; And many don’t.

    And this is exactly the point of this article.
    The problem with Jess’s story and other “cancer success stories” is that they are often advertised as evidence of a therapy’s overall efficacy, when in fact personal anecdotes are very insufficient for this purpose.
    That’s what clinical trials are for, since they examine large numbers of people with far more strict criteria ; they won’t predict the outcome for a specific person with 100% certainty, but they allow for a comparison between therapies.
    And in Gerson’s case, it has been far less tested than conventional treatment, and when it was, the evidence wasn’t good. Not a good sign.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Gerson#Evidence

    So here the point is not “See ? Gerson doesn’t work.”
    It is “See ? Stop advertising cancer success stories as evidence.”


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  38. 88
    janeD Says:

    @Bryan #86 Look at Steve’s addendum to his original blog post:

    “UPDATE: SHE DIED ON FEBRUARY 26, 2015.
    It took about 3 years from the time this was published and seven years since the first diagnosis. That is roughly the time that one would have expected. She was 30 years old. Her loss is very sad.”

    http://depletedcranium.com/jessica-ainscough-is-going-to-die/


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  39. 89
    DV82XL Says:

    The problem with Jess’s story and other “cancer success stories” is that they are often advertised as evidence of a therapy’s overall efficacy, when in fact personal anecdotes are very insufficient for this purpose./quote]

    I know you are not supporting alternate medicine, but what sort of mental gymnastics do these people have to go through to spin Ainscough’s death into a ‘cancer success story’?


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  40. 90
    BMS Says:

            DV82XL said:

    … what sort of mental gymnastics do these people have to go through to spin Ainscough’s death into a ‘cancer success story’?

    Not much. “Mental” hardly enters the equation. They’re trying to appeal to the heart, not the mind. It doesn’t have to be logical. It doesn’t have to be coherent.


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  41. 91
    LouV Says:

    @DV82XL #89
    I didn’t mean that her death was now spun into a “cancer success story” (although I have seen some say that she supposedly lived longer than patients on conventional treatment ; but it seems much much more complicated that that).
    I meant that BEFORE her death, she was paraded as living proof of the efficacy of the therapy.
    I was reacting to the people saying : “She died, but it isn’t proof that Gerson doesn’t work ; after all, what do you have to say about people who die while following conventional therapy ?”
    To that I answer : Exactly, glad we agree on that ! So why don’t we stop advertising success stories altogether, and rely instead on CT for all therapies ?


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  42. 92
    DV82XL Says:

    I understand LouV my remarks were parenthetic, and I know I was quoting you out of context.


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  43. 93
    DV82XL Says:

    If anything good come from this it is that the wheels seem to be falling off Belle Gibson (she of the so-called Gibson Therapy) that Ainscough believed would cure her.

    It would seem Charity money promised by ‘inspirational’ health app developer Belle Gibson not handed over

    and

    Belle Gibson, whose story of miraculous survival from terminal cancer helped launch a global “health and wellness” business, has admitted that her claim of suffering multiple life-threatening cancers may be false.

    Exposed by our own commenter Rose on her own blog Reality Based Medicine there is a veritable laundry list of BS emerging from a closer look at Gibson


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